Twitter Warriors: How Do Deal With White Nationalist Trolls

On a recent episode of the cleverly titled Fash the Nation, another podcast project of the Right Stuff, they opined about Trump’s big failure in Iowa. To join the regular hosts Jazz Hands McFeels and Marcus Halberstram they invited Raiden, a Twitter “sensation” who bragged about how good he is at trolling.  He proudly declared that he keeps “hate facts” in his bookmarks so he is ready to “Red Pill” people on social media, a term used originally by the Men’s Rights crowd and means to reveal the truth(which actually means to be racist).  He went on, at length, about how great he was at harassing people on Twitter, so much that he often gets banned.  The hosts egged him on, also congratulating him for this major “achievement.”

The new Alt Right is being tactically informed by people like the Right Stuff and the Daily Shoah who think that internet trolling, using infectious memes, and arguing with people in web forums is the same thing as political organizing.  Their project relies on this since they usually do not come from a history of political engagement, but instead from the recesses of extreme ideology that remote web forums often inspire.  While this is embarrassing right off the bat, it is not without its avenues.  They have successfully disseminated things like the Cuckservative, Alt Right, and Facts Aren’t Racist hashtags, they have created a groundswell of reactionary internet support for Trump, and they are feeding the vanguard of the racist movement to commit acts of violence and eventually join the kind of political organizations that we are seeing all over Europe.

We at Anti-Fascist News have also been pretty consistently “trolled” and blogged about from the far-right, where they are just begging to get a mention.  The Daily Shoah has devoted segments of several of their shows to us, and their forum will link to us so many times that we quickly become the top Google search results(good strategy guys).  Attack the System, the website run by Keith Preston and best known for pushing National Anarchism, has run a full six articles about us, desperately trying to pull us into a debate.  We actually did counter a couple of their claims, only because they have occasionally moved their arguments into anarchist circles and so we need to develop a good rhetorical foundation to unhinge their ‘pan-secessionist” rhetoric.  Occidental Dissent, the Traditionalist Youth Network, the National Anarchist Network of Texas, Jack Donovan, and others have made us the target of their attention in recent months, hoping that they can get a word in on our conversation.  Daily we get hate comments, often with racial slurs, and usually they believe that we are going to allow their comments to be posted so that they can, again, troll.  On Twitter they will tag us so as to draw us into an “internet feud” so they can fuel their blog diarrhea, especially since their lack of relevance can stop them from having appealing content.

Our policy is to completely refuse to discuss things, allow them to link to us, or to even provide access to our social media.  We regularly block fascists if they tag us on Facebook or Twitter, which happens a couple times a week.  We will work to break the links when they link directly to our website, and we never, ever allow racist or right-wing comments to post on our website.  We aim to be a useful resource for anti-fascist and anti-racist organizing, so we prioritize the goals of organizing above all else.  Complete radio silence and removing them as regularly as you can will be the best way to regularly segregate them from important conversations.  We prefer if our boosts in traffic comes from anti-racists looking to find out what is happening inside of the racist community, not just out of a lurid curiosity, but because we need this information to inform strategy.

As long as we continue, we expect to get followed closely by these groups as they look for any avenue to get coverage.  Instead, in our discussions about them we refuse to link to them or provide them an open platform of any type.

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Crack in the Facade: How Splits in the White Nationalist Movement Can Help Anti-Fascists

For anyone who has been on the ideological radical left, especially in Marxist or anarchist organizations, they know exactly what it is like to get caught up in petty disagreements and insular political arguments.  It is what has led to the trend towards “splitting” in communist organizations, and what keeps many of these politically centered parties and groups from growing beyond a couple hundred members.  Much of this has led to high profile infighting, where disagreements that are unintelligible to those outside an ideological cadre are unable to even understand what the two parties are so passionate about.

For those organizing against institutions of capital and the state, there is certainly a need to create strong bonds on points of agreement and to save disagreements over tactics and strategy to internal discussions.  The primary reason for this is that the opposition looks for points of weakness, cracks in our structure that they can exploit to weaken us in critical ways.  This “divide and conquer” strategy has been primary to the way that bosses weaken labor battles, landlords destroy tenant unity, and how the ruling class generally fractures any kind of working-class identity that is needed to combat forces that have the money and the state-supported power.

On the flip side, those on the reactionary edges of white supremacy, patriarchy, homophobia, and other parts of an intersectional neo-fascist movement, are also subject to the same forces.  In the recent years many of these voices have rebranded and adapted to a new generation of white nationalists who are coming from middle-class, tech-friendly jobs and families.  There has been a great call for unity that was often impossible in the earlier days of the KKK or neo-Nazi skinheads, all of which were subject to tribal gang fights over non-political issues.  This new core has intellectual backgrounds and are using philosophy and pseudo-science as the foundation of a new nationalism, and by keeping strategy and tactics vague they have been able to create bonds that were less easy to break.

Yet, as is always the case on the far right, their egos remain unchecked and, eventually, they do begin to crack.  It is at these points that anti-fascists can exploit these breaks in solidarity between them, and find ways to weaken and destroy their movements by isolating them from each other.  Over the last couple years it has been easy to see where the points of contention between these people are since they are often along the lines of those who have developed a following.

When thinking about where the fractures are in the Alt Right, one person comes up as a point of rupture: Richard Spencer.  Spencer is known for coining the term Alternative Right from his former webzine, which was created to bring together different dissident reactionary forces that were coming together around 2010.  He has eventually helped to bring together a vague collection of white nationalists, post-libertarians, traditionalists, Men’s Rights dissidents, identitarians, racial pagans, and others, into a general new white nationalism.

He also popularized podcasts as being a primary way to outreach to the rest of the movement since reading is not always their strong suit.  Vanguard Radio was his first attempt at this, starting by interviewing people like the American Freedom Party’s Merlin Miller, Youth for Western Civilization’s Kevin Deanna, and techno-futurist and neo-reactionary Rachel Haywire.  He also brought on fellow racists Colin Liddell and Andy Nowicki to co-host a rambling version of the podcast.  Both of them had been contributors, and later editors, at Alternative Right.  At one point Spencer decided to leave Alternative Right as an editor, yet he continued the podcast and blogging at the website.  Andy and Colin stepped up as the primary editors, and when Spencer told them in private that he kind of wanted the website to come down so he could move on, they insisted that it stay.  After an incident happened with Jason Richwine, the Rachel Maddow Show at MSNBC did a story about Alternative Right and the National Policy Institute, which Spencer had taken over at this time.  Here they identified a story by Colin Liddell where he essentially denies the Holocaust and mocks the Jews who died.  He did not like being associated with this since he did not have any editorial control over what was published.  On Christmas Day of 2013 he took down Alternative Right and made the URL link to his new web magazine, Radix Journal.

Andy and Colin were understandably enraged, and Colin went on social media rants calling Spencer a “Dick-tator.”  They reformed a new website called the “New Alternative Right,” and started their own podcast.  In one early episode dedicated to Spencer’s decision, Colin spoke about Spencer’s behavior and penchant for talking over his guests.

In 2014 Spencer tried to have a “pan-European” conference in Budapest, Hungary.  This was going to bring white nationalists from around Europe, America, and Russia to come together and talk about “European unity.”  The docket was to include people like Alexander Dugin and Jared Taylor.  The Hungarian government, under pressure from the socialist party, declared that the conference would not happen, moving all the way up to the Prime Minister, Viktor Orban.  Spencer decided he would not listen to the government’s order and would go anyway, even though the government canceled their hotel bookings.  At a private dinner of conference attendees, the police showed up and arrested Spencer.  They deported him, banning him from European nations.  The conference ended up just happening in private at the dinner location, with Tomislav Sunic and Jared Taylor as its only speakers.

It was this situation that actually mended the relationship between Liddell and Nowicki with Spencer.  He went on their podcast shortly there after, and even though Liddell used this opportunity to talk over Spencer and throw insulting jokes at him, it seemed as though they would make it through.  Liddell ended up going on Spencer’s new podcast, the Radix Journal Podcast, several times to talk about the Scottish Independence vote and on a series they did on James Bond.

The situation in Hungary did, however, stoke problems that were forming between Greg Johnson and Richard Spencer.  Johnson is the founder and editor of Counter-Currents Publishing, which publishes a lot of racist and traditionalist books by people like Savitri Devi and Jonathan Bowden.  They are known for their blog and pocast, which attempts to be even more high brown than Radix while also being more offensively racist.  When Spencer still called for people to fly into Hungary even though hotels were being canceled by the state and they were having calls for deportation, Johnson became incensed.  He took to Twitter to insult Spencer and state that he owes all conference attendees a “complete refund.”  He went on to make insulting comments about Spencer’s wife, saying he was controlled by her and referring to her as “Nina Nogoodnick.”  This stopped the growing relationship between the two flat.  Spencer had recently had him on several podcasts to discuss movies and Johnson had hosted Spencer discussing what had happened with the shut down of Alternative Right.  The irony here was that Johnson went on, at length, about how this type of public infighting is just useless and antithetical to their cause.  Their relationship was never really patched up, and they were both known to make passive jokes about each other in interviews and podcasts.  They were eventually both on a round table podcast at Red Ice Radio with RamZPaul, John Morgan of Arktos Publishing, and Daniel Frieberg.  The discussion moved to the debate over pan-European unity versus regional European nationalism.  Spencer is known for calling for a new “white empire” that gets over “petty nationalisms.”  Johnson discussed the importance of having these regional states, telling Spencer that “reality had vetoed his dream.”  They got incredibly heated insulting one another while the host desperately tried to get things on track.

These differences and arguments seem silly to us, and they are.  Yet to the neo-fascists who are trying to move from their basements and into the political sphere, they are incredibly meaningful.  In knowing where their fractures are we can begin to develop a strategy that plays on this as a weakness.  Greg Johnson and Richard Spencer are both “intellectual” leaders of the Alt Right, and their strong personalities have the ability both to create leadership and to turn their followers off.  To confront this we can find ways to further split their connections apart by highlighting the differences between them, and trying to stoke their infighting into public displays of disunity.  What if, when shutting down one of their events, anti-fascists also go onto internal forums and place blame on other parties?  This can have the effect of shrinking any cadre that they have with a common purpose, which also diminishes its effectiveness.

By highlighting their splits we can also help to communicate to those who may see them as an attractive dissenting force, show that they actually lack any ideological clarity or ability to force political programs.  They are ineffective as organizing agents, which is clear since they rarely have any organizational plans, but if we continue to exploit their fragments we can show them for the impotent forces that they are.  Using messaging on our end that not only confronts the bigots directly, but also creates dissent and infighting in their ranks can be an effective tool for destroying their mobilization.

Infighting around Richard Spencer has been happening for well over a year now beyond just the skirmishes mentioned.  His dismissal of Orthodox Christianity has made him persona non grata in some of the more neo-Confederate, Kinist, and religious communities associated with the Traditionalist Youth Network, the League of the South, and others.  He recently banned Trad Youth’s Matthew Heimbach for his recent comments about same-sex relationships where he claimed that queer people are intentionally spreading HIV.  This brought offense to the NPI participants, one of which is the “andriophile” Jack Donovan.

By highlighting their own infighting we can continue to show their weak points, disable their ability to create compelling narrative or fronts, and maintain their position on the fringes.  Part of this is allowing them to walk themselves into corners, which they often do through their own bizarre political ideas and their ability to attract those with political egos.  In the case of Heimbach, we can continue to highlight his homophobia in an effort to not only alert the public to his disgusting ideas, but also to call the attention his fellow fascists.  The more they clash internally, the weaker they will be.  For anti-fascist organizing, this is always going to weaken the opposition and make those white nationalists that do creep up even easier to marginalize.

Occidental Dissent, another one of the more offensive racist websites, actually has publicized these arguments between bigots.  In a post from 2014 they outlined a big list of “who hates who.”  Though it is a little old, it seems to be more or less accurate even today.

Get your popcorn.

Check out this partial list of ongoing current beefs:

  • Greg Johnson vs. Daily Stormer

  • Greg Johnson vs. Richard Spencer

  • Alternative Right vs. Daily Stormer

  • Alex Linder vs. Jared Taylor

  • Alex Linder vs. Greg Johnson

  • Ramzpaul vs. Robert Ransdell

  • Daily Stormer vs. Ramzpaul

  • Greg Johnson vs. Matt Parrott

  • Bob Whitaker vs. Stormfront

  • Alex Linder vs. Bob Whitaker

  • Sebastian Ronin vs. Countless People

  • My Picks For Most Intense Beef

  • Hadding vs. Harold Covington

  • Will Williams vs. Harold Covington

  • Axis Sally vs. Harold Covington

Their movement is based entirely on the subjugation and oppression of “the other,” a notion that drives their ideological core.  They do not have the same foundation in thought and ideas you see in the radical left opposition, which makes it even easier to unravel when put under a magnifying glass.  At times, the ludicrous nature of their own racism will do it on its own.  The coup attempt in Leith, North Dakota a couple of years ago lays out a clear exampele of this.  Craig Cobb, a well known fringe neo-Nazi even by their own standards, began buying up property for next to nothing in a remote North Dakotan town.  Leith had a population of 26 people, and his plan was to overrun the town with fellow neo-Nazis so as to take control of the Town Council.  He deeded property over to members of the National Socialist Movement and former White Aryan Resistance organizer, Tom Metzger.  The town put up an incredible show of counter-organizing, with great support from local First Nations tribal leaders and anti-racists.  A confrontation was put forward to Cobb to do a DNA test that would prove his racial ancestry.  He accepted this challenge, and when it came back proving that he was 14% Sub-Saharan African he saw a great deal of his support dry up.  This came from the internal contradictions inside of his Creativity Movement, which is the most militant side of the white nationalist movement demanding racial purity.  In reality, almost no person appearing white has only European genetic ancestry, so it is literally a contest that they cannot win.  By leaving themselves open it provided anti-racists an opportunity to confront them, not only to dismiss their message publicly, but to create a backlash internally as his fellow skinhead supporters began demanding him out of his own white community.

Because we do not want to ever provide them a platform, and because we organize to defend our communities from them, we often do not have the resources to attempt to exploit these cracks in their ranks.  With their influx of public media and loud voices we now have more information about high-profile racists than ever before, which means that we can integrate these strategies into our more general messaging.

Let’s continue to show the world who these people are and the fallacies that their calls for “white revolution” depend on!

White Nationalists Pout After Trump Loses Iowa

The level of delusion that many on the racist right had developed about Trump’s candidacy has given the Iowa defeat significant .  This run was the largest crossover point they have had in decades, many using it as the launching pad for their growth.  The American Freedom Party funded robocalls in Iowa voiced by American Renaissance’s Jared Taylor, The Right Stuff’s Fash the Nation podcast was almost entirely dedicated to Trump, and Richard Spencer and the Radix Journal have made Trump their main course of content for months.

Now, with Ted Cruz sweeping Iowa and putting Trump in second(almost third), their vision has been shattered.  Richard Spencer put out a video almost immediately showing his own disappointment for Trump’s fate.  He was holding a small glass with two fingers of bourbon to quell his melancholy.

I certainly found myself with a sinking feeling about two hours in, or so, when thirty percent of the caucuses were reporting and he was down by three, or something, and I sensed a loss…I think, in a way, the election says something about Iowans.

In the video he also mentions that this may not mean anything and that there are a lot of situations where Iowa does not determine exactly who wins the election.  While this is certainly true in some cases, this shows the level of fantasy that they are willing to stick with when their golden boy is falling.  This is a bit ironic after a podcast he did with Paul Gottfried where he made fun of the delusional ideologues who thought that Mitt Romney had a chance against Obama’s re-election.

The Daily Stormer, whose vulgarity is putting them towards the top of the neo-fascist Google search results, posted an article titled “Take Heed, Brothers: We are Still in Charge,” where they again dove into the details of the primary race and spun the results in their favor.  They also worked in a few racial slurs and racist cartoons into their coverage.

Without the cuckold evangelical element, Cruz loses all appeal and becomes just a much less interesting and much less honest version of Donald Trump.

The lack of evangelicals also makes Magic Negro pointless.

In 2012, New Hampshire people really liked Ron Paul (he came in second), so probably Son of Paul will do better there, due to his empty libertarian rhetoric, spreading things out a bit.

The Daily Stormer really could not let it go and instead ran a story the next day suggesting that the polls in New Hampshire put Trump at 34%, above Ted Cruz’ 12%.  They again use this as an opportunity to attack Iowa for going with the Cuban.

Iowa obviously disappointed us all.

But we need to understand that polls were for a long time oscillating there between Cruz and Trump. Nothing has been lost here.

A few people got rustled jimmies when I yesterday made a bunch of mean-spirited jokes about Iowaians being village people, some feeling that I was insulting rural people.

Firstly, I won’t apologize for making fun of Iowaians. Regardless of the reasons behind it, voting for Ted Cruz is a betrayal of America. We are all angry about this, and making fun of these people is a way to let some of that anger out.

Along the same lines, The Right Stuff suggested that Iowa was the “most likely” to be corrupt with voter fraud.  They continued to note that Trump would probably win New Hampshire, which is politically backwards, as was their persistence that Trump was still the front runner.

Kevin McDonald, the former UC Long Beach professor who became the Karl Marx of anti-Semitism and adopted radical white nationalist positions, penned a piece for his pet website, The Occidental Observer.  As with his colleagues, he strained the limits of his understanding of big-party politics by trying to break down the poll numbers.

And sorry, I can’t take the Goldman Sachs-funded Cruz seriously even though he, like Trump, wants to keep Assad in power and, like Trump, is sounding quite patriotic on immigration—with a resounding endorsement coming from none other than Jeff Sessions — as well as trade policy. But his policies on immigration are a pale reflection of Trump’s, and I just can’t help feeling that this is opportunism — realizing that Trump’s populism has legs.  Trump is really angry about the status quo, whereas Cruz only brought up these issues after Trump put them in play. Trump means it and will do everything he can to bring about change. Hard to believe that Cruz will. And hard to believe that this Canadian-born, half-Cuban really has a strong emotional attachment to the traditional White majority of the US.

McDonald also thinks that Trump is headed to victory in New Hampshire, which is curious given the streak for free-market libertarians who have a problem with Trump’s proposed tariff system.

The anti-immigration website VDare, founded by former Forbes writer turned American Renaissance fellow Peter Brimelow, suggested that it was actually “dirty tricks” and voter fraud that robbed Trump of Iowa Caucuses.  They specifically cite Rubio’s surge, a fact that almost all of these groups deplore because of their hope that the GOP base could be mobilized as a white-racial interest group.

Several allegations of voter fraud are being reported in Iowa, especially on the Democratic side. There are reports of missing results and improper methods used to record votes.  But some Republicans also reported absolute chaos.

The bottom line is that the election system is a mess. When votes are this close, we really have no idea who actually won. And the idea that Microsoft has any role in reporting the vote tallies is completely insane.

The New Observer broke down the numbers into fractions of percentage points over different polls in an attempt to explain away the fact that Iowans simply did not prefer the racist.  They again think that Trump will triumph in New Hampshire and South Carolina.  The real enemy here is the Republican party, which apparently “controls” the caucus system in Iowa.

Party primaries in Iowa are run on the “caucus” system, where, instead of going to a polling booth, voters attend local private events run by the political parties to make their selections.

The caucuses are strictly controlled by the party organizations, and are thus heavily weighted in favor of the party machines, made up as they are by only the most involved, dedicated, and long-time party officials.

As a result, they tend not to reflect the very large number of disaffected white voters who have emerged from long periods of political inactivity or even total non-activity—precisely the voters who Trump has very largely appealed to.

This really does not explain how the GOP would alter the voting structure other than openly falsifying them, but its not like the far right is immune to conspiracy theory.

What happens in New Hampshire will be telling and if Trump again comes in almost third they will likely have a complex narrative for why this happened and how it actually reflects Trump’s white popularity.  Even though the electoral process is not a significant factor in anti-fascist strategy, it certainly signals that the Trump-train will no longer be a popular way that the Alt Right attempts to mainstream their views.

 

What Happens if Trump Takes Iowa?

In a recent conversation between Radix Journal’s Richard Spencer and the Twitter white nationalist sensation Ricky Vaughn, Donald Trump’s upcoming primary showing in Iowa was the key point.  Both of these characters see Trump’s campaign as a proxy for the unchecked anger of reactionary whites, and when the Iowa GOP polls open on Monday it will set the trend for New Hampshire a week later and, in essence, the rest of the primaries.  According to CNN, 30% of Republican primary voters are going to pushing for Trump, the second closest behind him is the ultraconservative Ted Cruz at 12%.  Many laughed at the beginning of Trump’s bid, and when he pulled to the top of the GOP polls he was often compared to the 2012 race of Herman Cain.  Except he stayed there.

Iowa is also looking this bleak, with the Des Moines Register recently clocking him at 28% above Cruz’s 23%.  It will be safe to say that when looking at these numbers, one of the two of them will win, and it would be more surprising at this point to see Cruz pull to the lead.

The issue for anti-fascists is less about how to counter him with an election strategy and more about what this type of turn means for the confrontation of the far right in America.  A liberal strategy may be to just double down on Bernie, or even to go with Hilary since a more middle ground candidate will have the ability to dethrone Trump in the general election.  There is little to be done in the Republican race as they seem to be leaning towards the far right of the party on all fronts, with so-called “moderates” like Jeb Bush dropping quickly.

So, what would happen if Donald Trump does win in Iowa?  Putting politics aside, what you will see is the continued mainstreaming of nationalism in America.  The Alt Right has ridden the Trump wave into the semi-mainstream, with a break happening in the GOP between those who want to stick with party orthodoxy and those who are going to give in fully to reactionary impulses.  We are certainly seeing this with conservative loudspeakers like Rush Libaugh and Anne Coulter, who has been contributing to VDare recently and has been both quoting and following American Renaissance’s Jared Taylor on Twitter.  Week by week, publications like The Right Stuff, The Daily Stormer, and Radix Journal chock up all of their references in the mainstream media as memes like Cuckservative head from the margins into the mainstream.

The reverse effect that this has, which is the sort of dialectic that nationalists like Richard Spencer love to site, is that Donald Trump represents the re-Republicanization of white nationalism.  Over the last five years, those on the Alt Right have been pushing white nationalism away from the party politics that it consorted with through Libertarianism and Paleoconservatism.  People like Sam Francis and Joe Sobran were dead while Pat Buchanan, Paul Gottfried, Peter Brimelow, and, later, Jason Richwine and John Derbyshire, had been blacklisted from the Conservative Movement.  They were shifting in the direction of right-wing philosophy, revivalist paganism, traditionalism, and dissident strains on the revolutionary pan-fascist movement.  Their movement, dripping in Idealism and completely divorced from conventional politics, was trying to define a right-wing counterculture.  With Donald Trump, they have rushed back to the center, attempting to mainstream their movement in ways that havn’t been possible since David Duke.  The only difference here is that they are bringing their racist vulgarities with them, and the reactionary impulse that Trump has cultivated has been accepting of this.  At a time when racial tensions have hit even harder during the refugee immigration and recent attempts to confront police racism, those on the edge are being given permission to jump into their racial resentments full force by Trump’s rhetoric.  Their white nationalist movement has a chance not to go mainstream as they would have liked, but for their bigotries to hit the tip of everyone’s tongue.

Trump winning in Iowa will open up that platform further, but, unfortunately, the gates have already been opened.  Right now it is up to antifascists not to just confront Trump, or to simply catalog and oppose this insurrectionary nationalist movement, but to continue to undermine white supremacy and racism in all ways possible.  This means continuing to mobilize with Black Lives Matter, to go after anti-immigrant extremism in our communities, and to defend against Islamophobia.  The fascist reaction is not just one type of politic, but instead intersectional in its fear and bigotry.  If Trump wins then that is a sign of where we are at, and it means that there will be continued polarization between those that want to restore white privilege and those that seek to undermine oppression.

In a certain sense, Monday is not as important as what comes next for the anti-racist movement.  Trump’s turn was shocking, as was the ability for white nationalists to mobilize around it, but their narrative still has yet to break through entirely.  An intersectional Antifa project, one that is able to confront them rhetorically, shut down their communication, expose who they are, and block them in the streets is what is going to shut it down before it starts.  Donald Trump represents a window for them, not their movement in its entirety.  If his numbers spike in the next few weeks it may inform the tactics and strategies of the anti-fascist left, but it will not change our underlying project.

Edgelords: The National Policy Institute Holding Washington D.C. Conference in March

In an effort to double up their popular conferences, The National Policy Institute is going to be having a conference only a few short months after their Halloween event.  Set to coincide with the Conservative Political Action Conference, which makes sense with their use of the Alt Right branding, the event will bring together “shitlords” and white nationalists from the growing recesses of the internet-focused racialist movement.  The evening event, on March 5th, is going to be smaller than NPI’s regular conference event, which usually spans an entire day.  This conference, called Identity Politics, will bring together Richard Spencer, the NPI president, Kevin McDonald and RamZPaul.

Richard Spencer has been one of the people at the center of the recent upsurge in this particular wing of the white nationalist movement.  Focused on social media, podcasting, and YouTube conversation videos, the new Alt Right has evolved beyond what it had been previously.  Spencer coined the term in 2010 with his website Alternative Right, which was meant to bring together “dissident” right wing ideologues that were leftovers from paleoconservatism, libertarianism, the Old Right, traditionalism, and all the other “edge” philosophies that were leading in a neo-fascist direction.

This was a “big tent” approach that was meant to associate these disparate forces with each other, but he moved on from this approach when joining NPI and forming the Radix Journal.  The term Alt Right, however, stayed, and it became synonamous with a white nationalist movement that had little connection to the silly costumes of the KKK and neo-Nazis.  Instead, this group formed an ideology that was a hodgepodge of the new scientific racism of Human BioDiversity, the strange “critiques” of democracy from Neoraction, the general attack on egalitarianism, a focus on the spirituality of ethnic Heathenry, the traditionalism of Julius Evola, and a great deal of misrepresented scraps of the social sciences to justify “identitarian” focus on ethnic identity as well as classic racial hatred and anti-Semitism.  These people see themselves as a break from the racism of the past, yet they simply repackaged it for a different audience.

The new shift was largely from association with The Right Stuff and their cohorts, which focus on internet trolling, using internal jargon, repeating offensive jokes, and using social media and blogs as their primary vessel rather than any kind of organizing.  You would expect that this would change the speaking demographics of the NPI conference, but most of the people associated with this side of the movement do not use their real names and would not let their faces be seen lest anti-fascists identify and doxx them.  The main exceptions to this was Mike Enoch from the Daily Shoah’s appearance on the NPI conference podcast, though he wore sunglasses during the panel to try and conceal his identity.  UnCuck the Right, an internet sensation that does the same embarrassing parody songs that The Right Stuff is famous for, is presenting at American Renaissance as well, which is again a surprise for a grouping who hides behind avatars.

Instead, Spencer will be joined by former University of California at Long Beach professor Kevin McDonald.  McDonald is known for creating a “unified theory of anti-Semitism” which his Culture of Critique series.  Here he states that Judaism is a “group evolutionary strategy” where Jews use ethnocentrism and high verbal IQ to outcompete Gentiles for resources.  He identifies things like Marxism, Freudianism, contemporary anthropology, Frankfurt School philosophy, and other movements as pseudoscience created by Jews to destroy Western identity and therefore come out on top.  McDonald was a well regarded evolutionary psychology academic before going off the deep end, and now writes for various white nationalist publications like the Occidental Quarterly on the need to reclaim ethnic nationalism and avoid what he calls “white altruism.”  Over the last year he has been doing speeches and interviews about the “origins of the white man,” which he did both at last year’s NPI event and at the Stormfront Smokey Mountain Summit.  He is working on a book on this theme, where he butchers anthropology in an effort to create a “history” of white people as a monolithic and distinct history.  Here he resurrects a strict racial taxonomy, one that has literally no place in contemporary biology or anthropology, as well as distinct categories from the early 20th century like “nordics.”

RamZPaul will join the two, who does actually come in similar to the silly format set by The Right Stuff.  He does popular YouTube videos where he decries liberalism, multiculturalism, and “the modern world,” usually with a penchant for bad stand-up comedy.  Over the last couple of AmRen and NPI conferences he has taken on a specific topic to sort of “explain,” though they usually show that he does not have a clear grasp on the concepts himself.  In his recent AmRen talk on the “Dark Enlightenment” he went on to briefly explain critiques of democracy and equality as well as the preference for monarchy, but with all of the platitudes and generalizations it became obvious that he had not been able to understand Nick Land’s work and was generally out of touch with the science and philosophy that movement claims as its own.  At the March event RamZPaul will try to explain what the Alt Right is, which may actually creates some dissonance in the crowd since he is not a strict white nationalist.

Spencer’s talk will likely be one of his usually “if you dream it we can built it” rants, where he talks vaguely about “ideas” and “passion,” yet clearly does not have a political program to support it.  It may be simply to support Donald Trump, who is fawningly supported by the Alt Right.  Spencer himself really pushes a sort of “right Idealism” where by he thinks these sorts of expensive conferences and constant blog diarrhea are comparable to building a movement.  This provides Antifa its greatest opportunity to challenge their existence since all they want, literally, is a platform.  They have no other strategic elements to the movement, and they are hoping that the groundswell from the Donald Trump primary bid will be enough to move to the next stage in their fascist project.

Confrontation at the NPI conference is often difficult since it is usually held in The Ronald Reagan Building in The Rotunda of Washington D.C.  They have been resistant to organizers asking them to cancel the event, and strict security keeps protesters relatively far from the entrance.  What has been seen recently is that the swell of young people has come primarily from people who do not want their identity’s released, so photos and videos of conference attendees is an important operation.  Pressure can be put on the operations of the Ronald Reagan building year round so that when it comes time for NPI to sign its contract, there is already a show that the community will not accept that.  This could be a long-term organizing project for those in the area, but really any organization nationally could take up this campaign to show national discontent for what is happening there.

Below is the contact information for the Reagan Building if you want to make your voice heard about their hosting, but it may make sense to use this information to develop a long-term escalation campaign where community phone blasts, emails, and general mobilization can be done on a multi-month calendar.

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Well Dressed Racism: American Renaissance Returns to Tennessee

The modern racialist movement is defined by American Renaissance.  It bridges both the organized racism of the past and the contemporary Alt Right, Human BioDiversity, Neoreaction, and other movements who believe themselves superior to the KKK.  AmRen began in the early 1990s by Jared Taylor, a former West Coast editor for PC magazine and consultant to companies dealing with Japan.  Taylor, raised in Japan before going to Yale and then to France for graduate school, is a very literate and well spoken man.  His enunciation is important to him, so much so that he has developed an elitist accent that is just as artificial as his conference’s attempts at pedigree.  He formed AmRen to give intellectual credibility to his growing racist ideas.  He had already been making waves on the racist right when AmRen came into existence, publishing the book Paved With Good Intentions: The Failure of Race Relations in Contemporary America.  Getting good reviews from people like Pat Buchanan, he launched AmRen as a conference and newsletter that would further disseminate racist views using pseudoacademics and reviving old bio-racial rhetoric.

Beginning in 1990, AmRen brought together a couple hundred racists to talk about…well…racism.  What defined AmRen right from the beginning was really marginal ideas on bioscience that justified the notion that black people were inferior.  Speakers often try to replicate academic discourse, yet their ideas are simply that black people have lower IQs, are prone to criminality, and all races have trouble trusting one another for biologically deterministic reasons.  These conferences are also notable in the white nationalist community for its lack of anti-Semitism, though most of the conference attendees are only putting on a face for this event.  Several Jewish speakers have been seen at AmRen, including the ultra-Orthodox Rabbi Mayer Schiller and Mark Levin.  Both of them have been known for writing about IQ gaps and the need for traditional, racially static communities.

Over the years there have been speeches by controversial academics like J. Phillip Rushton, Richard Lynn, and Donald Templer, all of which quickly drop their veneer of respectable scholarship so that they can insult and degrade people of color.  This is all in line with what in “Human BioDiversity” circles is often called the “Yellow Hypothesis.”  This essentially revives a racial taxonomy and hierarchy, but one that shifts the dynamics slightly.  In this view, according to their theories on innate IQ, Asians have the highest IQs, whites just below them, then Latinos far below that and African descended people scraping the bottom of the list along with Australian aborigines.  This is what they use to refuse the label of “white supremacist,” but the dynamic is to suggest that Asians actually lack other qualities because of their high level IQs and therefore whites are essentially “just right.”  Jews, according to this, actually have higher IQs than Asians, but the AmRen crowd usually save that part of their analysis until the conference is over.  What some attendees, such as Professor Emeritus Kevin McDonald, suggest is that the high verbal intelligence that this crowd ascribes to Jews has actually made them a parasite that uses their intellect to manipulate Western men away from their ethnic interests.  Though the general line-up of AmRen is certainly prone to conspiracy theories, this is a step too far for Taylor.

The focus on pseudoscience has really defined AmRen for almost two decades, yet in recent years there has been a shift.  Over the last few renditions of the conference, all of which have been at the Montgomery Bell State Park outside of Nashville, they have shifted away from arguments about racial difference in biology and more in the direction of politics and culture.  They have included many speakers from nationalist parties internationally, as well as many from the Alt Right that talk in vague platitudes in an attempt to revive racial Idealism and Romanticism.  This change is largely because they did not see the resurgence in “white racial consciousness” that they were hoping for from their previous discourse about perceived racial difference.  Taylor has been a bit slow off the mark, and because of the new focus on social media and streaming content, as well as the lower brow focus of modern post-Trump Alt Right, he has been the old man of the community.  While others are trying to maximize this Trump moment, Taylor continues to drivel on about black crime with barely-coded insults to movements like Black Lives Matter.

The coming 2016 conference, which will be held on May 20-22(which is actually longer than most AmRen conferences), replicates this new trend in their programming, as well as returning to attempts at respectability.  Similar to what you see in white nationalist conferences and organizations like the H.L. Mencken Club and the Council of Conservative Citizens, they always try to host speakers who are just on the edge of respectability.  This was the case with people like the late Sam Francis and Joe Sobran, who were both on the edges of the beltway Conservative Movement.

The 2016 conference’s “headliner,” so to speak, is Peter Brimelow, who is exactly the kind of crossover point that AmRen uses to make itself relevant.  Brimelow was a former writer for Forbes and a number of conservative publications, really known for writing about education and the “problem” of the teacher’s unions up through the 1990s.  In 1995 he published his “magnum opus,” Alien Nation, a book that rallied against immigration and the need to tighten the borders.  Brimelow himself was foreign born, a British immigrant, a point that is often lost on his supporters.  He then founded the web publication VDare, which has become a meeting point for the far right who want to focus on immigration as their primary issue.  He has slowly shifted out of the broad GOP crowd and into a racially focused community, speaking at other racist conferences like the H.L. Mencken Club and the National Policy Institute.  His talk brings the conference back to one of their real forces of excitement: Donald Trump.  Titled “The Trump Tsunami and the Future of the Historic American Nation,” Brimelow will continue the fawning appreciation for the billionaire just as most in the AmRen scene have.  Jared Taylor recently voiced a robocall for Trump support in Iowa, funded by the neo-fascist American Freedom Party.

James Edwards is also on the line-up, a person who has not been as prominent over the last year or so of the growing white nationalist movement.  He hosts the Political Cesspool, a white nationalist/populist radio show that is actually on a few AM stations beyond its large internet following.  He is on the board for both the Council of Conservative Citizens and the American Freedom Party, and he spoke up in defense of the CofCC after the Dylan Roof shooting.  The murderer mentioned the CofCC’s website, which obsessively focuses on what they falsely say are differences in black and white crime rates.  He represents a lower-brow sensibility for the AmRen community, which is really summed up by his book Racism Schmacism.  

Flemish nationalist Filip Dewinter will rant about the “Islamisation” of Europe, Ruuben Kaalep will give a plea for Estonian nationalist, and Dan Roodt will talk about “white survival” in post-Apartheid South Africa.  This is part and parcel of the new AmRen: trying to create unity between white racist internationally.  Here they often try to find common cause with white nationalist talking points in Europe, focusing largely on Syrian refugees and Islamic immigration.

RamZPaul will join the AmRen crowd, which he has in recent years, where he does a sort of “stand up routine.”  This mainly consists of awkwardly timed jokes coming straight out of his popular YouTube videos.  His comedic style is telling and has helped groups like The Right Stuff to focus on humor in their racism.  He will discuss the Alt Right, which has been seeing a surge of media attention in recent months because of the entryism that Donald Trump has provided for them.  This theme will be compounded with the inclusion of Uncuck the Right, a new YouTube “sensation” who does racist parody songs in the vein of The Right Stuff.  “Uncuck” is a reference to the Cuckservative meme that the Alt Right recently popularized, referencing the idea that mainstream conservatives do not act in their own racial interests in terms of immigration.  This also really shows AmRen begging to keep themselves relevant in the internet-only “shitlord” movement of angry white men.

Both Taylor and Sam Dickson will be speaking about “identitarianism,” Dickson giving the same “Benediction for Heretics” that he has done every year since 1990s premiere of the conference.

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Montgomery Bell facility where AmRen 2016 will be held.

Over the last several years of the conference, protesters have always been present.  In 2010 the conference was effectively shut down when pressure was put on the Four Points Sheraton at the Manassas Battlefield to cancel their reservation.  The following year, he attempted to hold it in a secret location, yet when the location was revealed to be the Airport Sheraton organizers were successfully able to shut it down again.  This later inspired lawsuits from David Yeagley, a self-described “American Indian” who the One People’s Project have revealed is actually Italian and consorts with white nationalists.  He tried to sue, among others, Daryle Lamont Jenkins, but the suits were ultimately unsuccessful before Yeagley passed away.  Now the conference has been moved semi-permanently to Montgomery Bell State Park, a government run facility that has been less responsive to organizing.

In 2013 organizers again clashed with conference attendees, this time out in Nashville.  After the primary conference, attendees including the Traditional Youth’s Network’s Matthew Heimbach and Scott Terry, RamZPaul, and several people from the CofCC and the League of the South all headed to a local par where Antifa organizers were also present.  A scuffle ensued where anti-racist organizers ended up being forced out of the bar, and the staff allowed the fascist parties to stay.

For 2016, research is being done about the attendees and location, and you can expect that the opposition to this festival of white self-congratulation will not be able to continue unchallenged.  If you are in the area, this is going to be one of the prime places to confront the dangerous white nationalist movement.

 

Pop Conspiracy: B.O.B., Tila Tequila, and the Digitizing of Old School Anti-Semitism

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A Twitter-storm is now the new headline factory, which is no surprise since silliness often hits the top of CNN and the New York Times based on trending hashtags.  While the Malheur rebellion was hitting its twilight, and the police standoff ended in a fatal shooting, B.O.B. was stealing some of the spotlight with his geological ideas.

For those who have not seen the flurry of articles and late-night monologues about this: B.O.B. believes the earth is flat.  We don’t mean this as a Friedmanesque analogy about 21st century corporate globalization, but literally that it is a disc.  The Flat Earth Society has existed for over a century continuing to play on contemporary conspiracy theories to argue that the Earth is not a globe as all of contemporary science proves.  Instead, they make strange arguments about the angling of the horizon and fundamentalist readings of the Bible to argue against what has been the consensus for hundreds of years.  In this view the Arctic Ocean and North Pole reside at the center of this spinning disc, Antarctica is a 150-foot ice wall that holds the oceans in from falling off the edge, and the Sun is about 3,000 miles above Earth.

Those who do ascribe to Flat Earth Theory are not your regular Alex Jones type crackpots, or even those who believe world leaders to be secret Reptilian Humanoids from the lower fourth-dimension.  No, this is the fringe of the fringe, and it would be hard to believe that their numbers are larger than a few hundred in the whole world.  Now, they have a few celebrity cohorts.

This began several weeks ago with former reality-star Tila Tequila going to Twitter to post that the earth was, in fact, flat.  “I WILL STOP MY #FLATEARTH TALK IF SOMEONE CAN SEND ME A GOD DAMN PHOTO OF THE HORIZON WITH A CURVATURE! OTHERWISE IT IS FLAT!,” read one of these.

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B.O.B., the rapper also going by Bobby Ray, then took this idea and ran with it, quoting silly talking points from Flat Earthers about the edge of the horizon, the angle of the sun, and the angles of vision.  Both Tila and B.O.B. went on to basically insult the world’s intelligence and call non-believers sheep, which is why it has been easy to focus on the level of stupidity at pla.  The unfortunate part is that neither Tila nor B.O.B. are simply parroting innocent eccentricities.

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After being made fun of by famed physicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, B.O.B. released a new track called Flatline.  Beyond being barely produced and sung, the song basically strung together various inane conspiracy theories.  Here he insinuates that NASA is a government control plot and pays Tyson for his participation.  Later B.O.B. tweeted him asking if he was a Freemason.  In Flatline, he goes on to discuss cloning, which he says is being done to black celebrities, and that science is a cult of liars.  At midpoint during the song he drops the following line:

Before you try to curve it, do your research on David Irving.

Stalin was way worse than Hitler.

That’s why POTUS gotta wear a Kippa

There is really only one thing that David Irving is famous for today: Holocaust Denial.

Irving began as a semi-respected historian of the Second World War, especially of Nazi Germany.  Though he was certainly allied with neo-fascist political programs while in college, he went on to publish major works on the Third Reich that were on cutting edge in terms of legitimate scholarship.  It was true that his work was problematic and sympathetic to Nazism even from the earliest publications, and he eventually began saying that the Holocaust was not on the direct order of Hitler.  After the Canadian trial of Ernst Zundel, who was being tried for “inciting racial hatred” for publishing the pamphlet Did Six Million Really Die?, Irving was swayed by the debunked testimony of Fred Leuchter.  He has associated with far-right and neo-Nazi groups, both in speaking for them in talks that blame Jews for their own persecution and for openly stating his own racial nationalist ideas.  Today, he is the most famous Holocaust Denier in the world as he is one of the only deniers who had a historical pedigree ahead of the denial.  He gained further notoriety after suing Deborah Lipstadt in the early 1990s after her book, the seminal work on holocaust denial, Denying the Holocaust, claimed that he was, in fact, a racist and a liar.  He then went through an embarrassing trial where he was forced to try and defend his claims about the Holocaust as a planned program for Jewish extermination, which he could not do.  He eventually lost both his claims and the counter-suit that Lipstadt leveled against him.  Later he was imprisoned in Austria for denying the Holocaust, where it is actually a serious crime.

What B.O.B. seems to be referencing here is a common claim on the far-right that Hitler’s numbers in terms of extermination and oppression were inflated, and in fact it was the Soviets who were the bigger criminals.  Part of this comes from the inclusion of German casualties to Soviet troops in WWII, as well as the numbers from political repression and incompetence in Stalin’s Russia.  The purpose of this comparison is to dethrone ethnic nationalism as an immediately recognized genocidal force and to instead list Nazi Germany as just one of the many violent regimes that have blanketed human history.  B.O.B. goes on to label the Jews specifically by mentioning the Kippa, saying that world leaders have to have Jewish allegiances.

This is not a coded message about Holocaust Denial, but an open reference to anyone that researched his message.  This took several days, and Salon was essentially the first source to go deep into his comments to analyze their background.  B.O.B. has referenced things like “false flag” U.S. attacks, bringing up the Alex Jones type conspiracy theories about 9/11.

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B.O.B. might seem like an outlier even to the conspiracy theory crowd, but, as Tila Tequila has shown previously, the connection to open anti-Semitism is much more ingrained.  In 2013 she inspired a massive controversy by posting a picture of herself in a modified Hitler costume.  Many people thought this was an ill-tempered attempt at provocation, but it was quickly put in context as she posted multiple blogs on her website showing admiration for Hitler and doubting the “official story” of the Holocaust.  If you were to then go through her forums and comments section, this connection became even more explicit.  Over and over again she said that contemporary Jews were in fact not Jews at all, but Khazars.  This is a less known conspiracy theory to the broad tinfoil hat crowd, and one that comes from the most violent annals of white nationalism.  Often present in Christian Identity churches, which also believe that people of color are not fully human and without souls, they believe that the ancient Israelites of the Bible were actually the European white race.  Jews were in fact a demonic tribe of people, sometimes considered to be a tribal band known as the Khazars.  They converted to the Babylonian Temple religion, a perverted version of the Old Testament, and its devious plans are fully revealed in the Babylonian Talmud.  In this theory, their main function is to leech on dominant national populations, trying to destroy the white race by inspiring race mixing.  This may sound too extreme for Tila Tequila to believe, and it is most likely from reading her mixed posts that she probably only read parts of a few blogs and articles before deciding Jews were evil, but this is certainly at the heart of her ranting.  Anyone that disagrees with her she calls a “dirty Jew” and a “Kike.”  She repeatedly says that Jews lie to get the State of Israel, that they tarnished great men like Hitler, and that they are in control of the media and the investment banks.  She was even thrown off of Celebrity Big Brother in mid-2015 after her comments surfaced, especially that she was the reincarnation of Hitler.

Hitler was a good man and it takes some f*****g balls for someone to say this out loud in this day and age, especially for a public figure like myself…Here is a man who was not a coward, stood up for his country in a desperate time of need… and yet not only did he try his best to help his country and people get out of what was a time of depression, economic collapse, high unemploymeny(sic). He lost the war and was painted out to be a monster after his death. This is what breaks my heart. (From her blog)

When speaking about the Jews in WWII specifically she was pretty candid.

What do you think war is about? People DIE in wars that is why I am against wars… I understand the Jewish people went through some s**t too, but hey guess what?? SO DID THE MAJORITY OF THE PEOPLE WHO SUFFERED IN EVERY SINGLE WAR THAT TOOK PLACE! You were NOT the only ones! So please, if the rest of us can forgive and forget maybe it’s time you do also!!!

The question that comes up from many media outlets right now is how two folks of color, B.O.B. and Tila Tequila, would be parroting extreme genocidal racists who would likely want to see them in camps just as much as Jewish people.  This is complex, but anti-Semitism itself has been ever present inside conspiracy theories that are still common in some communities of color.  Often deeply held inside black nationalist groups like the Nation of Islam, the Black Hebrew Israelites, and the Nuwabian Nation, Jews are vilified and seen as a primary agent in the colonial slave trade.  Anti-Semitism has historically been a main focus of conspiracy theories, from the identification of Freemasons as controlling the secret government to the trans-national Illuminati that is repackaged for every ideological specific development.  In How to Overthrow the Illuminati, which was a popular pamphlet discussing conspiracy theories in African American communities, anti-Semitism is able to unite working class people against their own interest in the same way that general racism can unite the white working class against their class unity.

Anti-Semitism united poor workers with small business owners, despite their opposed interests. The poor workers were angry about their treatment under capitalism, but saw Jews as a bigger enemy than their exploiting factory bosses. The small business owners worked to become the big-time exploiters of the poor workers, and felt Jews stood in the way of their goals. These two classes were fundamentally opposed to each other, but temporarily joined together in a populist movement, because of their mutual, misguided anti-Semitism. Populist movements join poor people with the petit-bourgeoisie, against imagined elite enemies. They speak in the name of the “common man,” but they’re guided by middle class elements, and screw over poor and working participants in the end. Contemporary examples of populism include the Tea Party, some parts of Occupy Wall Street, and the Nation of Islam. Illuminati theories are often populist in character. Many populist theories draw on anti-Semitism to identify an evil elite that runs the world.

Anti-Semitism is so ingrained in the history of conspiracy theory that any new conspiracy theory that has any continuity to the past will lead back to the blaming of Jews.  This is present in the notion that it was Israelis who committed 9/11 as well as the David Icke presented idea that there are certain “bloodlines” that control banks and who benefit from global violence.  This brings us right back to B.O.B., who uses the lyric “there’s no superior bloodline” in Flatline’s chorus, which, in this context, seems like a clearly coded reference to Jews and their supposedly “secret bloodline” that allows them to control global affairs.

B.O.B. is continuing to mention online that there are cloning centers that he himself has witnessed and that he is “going up against the greatest liars in history.”  He will likely be dismissed as a crank, which he is, yet his return to very traditional anti-Semitic conspiracy theories is a frightening reminder that this caricature of Jews is on the tip of people’s tongues.  When David Irving was questioned about B.O.B.’s reference to him in his song, he said, “[B.o.B] does not quite go along with what the media (and shortly, Hollywood) says about me, quite right.”  As Salon pointed out, Hollywood in this context is likely a snide reference to Jews.  It took all of two days before B.O.B. was added to the Wikipedia list of Holocaust Deniers.

Neil deGrasse Tyson responded to the recent Flat Earth claims by discussing the failure of American education, especially when it comes to the physical sciences.  He kept it pretty light with an appearance on the Daily Show, basically making fun of B.O.B. for his statements.  This is part and parcel of a media representation that has largely missed the depth that his comments.

This actually presents a challenge to anti-racists in that it requires a certain understanding of the history of anti-Semitism, its role in conspiracy theory and economic populism, and how we can continue to highlight how it goes unchallenged in many political spaces.  As we hit Holocaust Remembrance Day, it is a critical time to remember what has come before and what unchallenged hatred and scapegoating can result in.

 

White Nationalist American Freedom Party Running Donald Trump Super PAC

People may have noticed an aggressive shift in Republican Party politics with the inclusion of Donald Trump, and we aren’t talking about the Sarah Palin endorsement.  Iowa voters recently got a series of “robocalls” telling them to vote trump.  The calls featured the voice of Jared Taylor of the white nationalist organization, American Renaissance.

“I’m Jared Taylor with American Renaissance,” Taylor says. “I urge you to vote for Donald Trump because he is the one candidate who points out that we should accept immigrants who are good for America. We don’t need Muslims. We need smart, well-educated white people who will assimilate to our culture. Vote Trump.”

It also uses the Christian pedigree of Reverend Ronald Tan, the controversial Christian radio host.

‘My name is Reverend Ronald Tan, host of the Christian radio talk show program For God and Country. First Corinthians states: God chose the foolish things of this world to shame the wise and God chose the weak things of this world to shame the strong. For the Iowa caucuses, please support Donald Trump. He is courageous and he speaks his mind. God Bless.’

The Super PAC that has been going after swing-state voters with a call for “white unity” is funded by the American Freedom Party founder, William Johnson.  Johnson founded the AFP originally as the American Third Position party, referencing the “anti-communist, anti-capitalist” trend of fascism that rose in popularity in the 1980s.  His brand of white nationalism was less in line with these esoteric anti-capitalist fascist traditions and more American and “constitutionalist,” so they changed the name to gain broader appeal.  The Board of Directors of the AFP is a cast of the usual suspects of the far right.  Included are famed anti-Semite Kevin McDonald, anti-immigrant radical Virginia Abernathy, white nationalist radio-host James Edwards, and pseudo-academic nationalist Tomislav Sunic(strangely an immigrant himself).  They ran a presidential candidate in 2012 with Merlin Miller, a former filmmaker who became just beside himself with non-whites in Hollywood and the influence of “Jewish Cultural Marxism.”  The party itself was actually founded through the Golden State Skinheads, Southern California skinhead gangs, who wanted to take their politics in a more “legitimate” direction.

William Johnson himself was not new to white racialist politics.  When using the pseudonym James O. Pace he wrote a book that advocated what became known as the “Pace Amendment.”  This would repeal the 14th and 15th amendments and institutionalize deportations for all non-whites, except Native Americans and Hawaiians who would be allowed regulated reservations.  Johnson then used his own name to found the League of Pace Amendment Advocates to advocate for this man James O. Pace and his ideas.  He ran for public office in 1989, 2006, and 2008 on a white nationalist platform, scarcely even being mentioned in the results.  This poor showing inspired him to form what would become the AFP in 2010 as its only chairman.  His ideas have been part and parcel of the Americanist wing of the white nationalist movement, allied largely with the militia movement and general racial politics.  The only difference is his general support for Israel, which is certainly not shared by most in his party.

Donald Trump was pressed to denounce the robocalls from Media Matters, which he finally did with great reluctance.

BURNETT: Mr. Trump, when you hear that, does that shock you? Do you denounce that?

TRUMP: Nothing in this country shocks me. I would disavow it, but nothing in this country shocks me. People are angry. They’re angry at what’s going on. They’re angry at the border. They’re angry at the crime. They’re angry at people coming in and shooting Kate in the back in California and San Francisco. They’re angry when Jamiel Shaw shot in the face by an illegal immigrant. They’re angry when the woman, the veteran, 65 years old is raped, sodomized, and killed by an illegal immigrant. And, they’re very angry about it, and — by the way, thousands of other cases like that. They’re very angry about it. So, I would disavow that, but I will tell you people are extremely angry.

BURNETT: People are extremely angry, but to be clear, when he says, “We need smart, well-educated white people to assimilate to our culture, vote Trump,” you’re saying you disavow that. You do denounce that?

TRUMP: Well, you just heard me. I said it. How many times do you want me to say it?

BURNETT: A third would be good.

TRUMP: I said I disavow.

This no doubt upset Johnson to a degree, but is not going to stop the support.  He went on the Political Cesspool, the racialist radio program hosted by the AFP board member James Edwards, to discuss the issue.

JOHNSON: Donald Trump’s response when he was asked to address it was just a wonderful response. He disavowed us, but he explained why there is so much anger in America that I couldn’t have asked for a better approach from him.

EDWARDS: I was going to ask you about that. So, you know, of course I saw that. In a perfect world he would say, “You know what? These guys are right. What are you going to do about it?” But understandably there is still a political reality. I think fundamentally, as I say on this show time and time again, most middle American, middle class whites agree with us fundamentally on the issues. But he’s operating in a different world than that — I think it was certainly better than to be expected. And I thought too it was quite good, as you did Bill, so this was something that you can live with in terms of a response from the Trump campaign and of course from there it’s over. You know, the news cycle is over, if he’s asked about it again he’s already gone on record, he is the Teflon Don. He’s the Teflon candidate. This wasn’t of course made to hurt him, I don’t know how much it hurt or helped him. Ultimately I don’t think it did much of either — it might have marginally helped him. It certainly didn’t hurt him. And so his response is something that you greet with a level of respect, am I right?

JOHNSON: Oh yeah I do, I like it very much. And also the response that I got — I put my own cell phone number out there. And I got, oh, a hundred calls regarding it. Most of the calls were hang-ups. They wanted to know if it was a real phone number. So they’d either hang up or say, “Oh I’m sorry, wrong number.” But there were a majority of calls who were opposed to it but there were a minority of calls who approved of it, and liked it. So that was encouraging also. And that is a new phenomenon. Before we would have gotten no one who would be willing to come out and say that so these little things incrementally help raise awareness of the issues and help change public opinion.

The same response basically came from Jared Taylor as well, who went on to answer what he thought of the Trump “denouncement.”

Yes, he was, you know, for days everybody was calling him up, calling up his campaign saying, “What do you think of these horrible people? Denounce them, denounce them.” And he didn’t. You know, he just maintained a dignified silence as he’s capable of doing. And then finally when CNN’s Erin Burnett really forced him to say, “Well, I would disavow it.” But she asked him, “are you shocked by this? Will you denounce this?” “I’m not shocked by anything in America.” I thought that was a great line. He’s so quick on his feet. And then he goes to say, “I would disavow it” but then he goes on to explain why people are so angry. In effect, he’s saying, “Yeah, yeah, if you want me to denounce it I will, but I understand exactly what these guys are saying, they’re furious, and they’re right to be furious.” So if he disavowed us, he did it, I thought, in the nicest possible way.

The way that Trump handled this was similar to the response he had to the David Duke endorsement, where he basically took it in stride.

Johnson’s new Super PAC will be running the robocalls in Iowa until the beginning of February, which have already cost around $9,000.  Jared Taylor, who is lending his white nationalist “celebrity” to the calls, will be hosting his American Renaissance conference in Tennessee on May 20-22.  Anti-fascist organizers are planning counter demonstrations to confront what will likely be one of the largest racist events of the year.

 

Why We Should Stop Calling the Malheur Militia Terrorists, and Start Calling Them Racists

This last week has seen news coverage dominated by the resurrection of the Cliven Bundy ranch stand-off, this time in rural Oregon.  The story, which has been a little difficult to track down in the dense media coverage, reflects much of what sparked the Bundy standoff a couple years ago: rich white ranchers being incensed that they cannot use federal land at will and do what they want without legal recourse.  Dwight and Steve Hammond, ranchers in Eastern Oregon, own around 12,000 acres of land, as well as federal land use rights, that they use to graze cattle.  In 2012 the two were found guilty of lighting fires on Bureau of Land Management land in 2001 and 2006, which was listed as their way of hiding their illegal poaching attempts.  A judge friendly to the family gave them less than the mandatory-minimum sentences, which the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals later overturned after the two men had been released from their light prison stay.  They were court ordered then to return to prison to carry out their five year sentences.  Part of this comes from a perceived terrorism that was used to enhance the sentence, which comes from the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 because of the threat the fire had to trap four BLM firefighters and the fact that it was an arson on federal land.

This terrorism enhancement and recall of their release was seen as “double jeopardy” to many on the right, and it was taken up by a growing militia movement that see this as the federal government overreaching into the property rights of rural ranchers.  Ammon Bundy, son of white supremacist rancher Cliven Bundy, used this as an opportunity to restart the militia movement response to his family’s fight with federal authorities over his unpaid grazing fees for use of federal land.  What came next was well watched, as Bundy and Ryan Payne, a well known Islamophobic conspiracy theorist, came to Burns in December and set up a meeting called the Committee of Safety to try and stop the sentencing of the Hammonds.  As the group swelled, almost entirely from non-residents, they moved on to enter and occupy an administration building at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.  This is essentially a federal building used to protect the habitat and wildlife of the area, and likely an example of the kind of “liberal” public use of land that they want to see turned over to ranchers, miners, and loggers.

Left wing press jumped on this immediately, as it should as the danger of the right-wing militia movement brings the current threat to its peak in the early 1990s.  The conversation quickly shifted to the double standard that refuses to label this occupation as “terrorism,” especially given the fact that they are discussing “violent revolution” and are brandishing semi-automatic weapons.  While this rhetoric brings up obvious dissonance in media characterizations of things like Black Lives Matter versus the militia movement, it draws a problematic narrative that can have consequences that the radical left will feel.  When looking at the ongoing occupation of the federal buildings, there are a few key reasons that left wing commentary should move away from consistently calling them terrorists.

 

  1. The Term “Terrorism” Is a Bully Club of the State to Criminalize Dissent

 

Over the last fifty years of political organizing and conflict in the U.S., it is not the right-wing that has been the ideological victim of the word “terrorist.” In the early 2000s, the environmental and animal rights movement saw all semi-militant action moved directly under the banner of “eco-terrorism” with legislation like the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act.  Using the term “terrorism” is to a method of re-labeling militant actions as outside of possible political behavior and discourse, discredits it as conscious political activity with logical motivations, and attempts to reinforce the narrative that the state and its parallel institutions need to be protected from these “terrorists.”  This narrative is important because it creates a social support for the state and the ways it sets parameters of “acceptable political behavior.”  This notion does not necessarily undermine the reality that terrorism does exist, with a clear example of this being the culmination of the 1990s militia movement in the Oklahoma City Federal Building bombing of 1995.  Instead, going after non-violent direct action and labeling it as terrorism creates a model where by militant action of any kind, not just on the right, has the ability to be undermined and criminalized as such.

This issue is especially true when looking at the tactics of the militia’s confrontation currently, which is a building occupation.  This has been a staple of movements on the left for decades, many of which have matched its use of armed personnel and revolutionary rhetoric.  An example of this is the occupation of Alcatraz by the Indians of All Tribes, lasting for almost two years from 1969-71.  Citing the Treaty of Fort Laramie, unused federal land must be returned to the First Nations people who resided on it previously.  The occupation drew on the Civil Rights Movement and the growing anti-war movement, where occupations of tactical buildings was commonplace.  Since then, occupations have been used as a radical option in nearly every movement with direct action components, and on the flip side we have seen the BLM targeted by Earth First! organizers in similar ways.

Beyond its application for radical movements on the left, the term terrorism has been one of the primary forces of victimization in the all out assault on Muslims, both in this country and abroad.  The broad “war on terror” has been one of the most disasterous periods of U.S. foreign policy, leading the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people and an ongoing crisis of bigotry that singles Muslims out as prime suspects in almost every type of offense.  Simply the concept of terrorism, both undefined and inconsistent, is one that has lost almost all useful descriptive power, and its mere invocation is one that brings us back to the underlying bigotry and imperialism that it is used to justify.  In a similar way to discussions around “hate crimes” legislation in places like Against Equality, it is difficult to see why invoking terrorism can do anything but further empower an “anti-terrorist” state apparatus that is unequally victimizing to people of color and other minorities.  It is not going to be the shotgun clad ranchers that feel the brunt over any resurgence of “terrorist” fervor, it is going to be the most oppressed classes in general.

The judge that issued the terrorism enhancements and called for the Hammonds to return to prison to serve out a much longer sentence was Judge Anne Aiken.  People may remember her as the Judge who ruled over the 2005 Operation Backfire arrests, where members of the Earth Liberation Front had terrorism enhancements added to their sentences for property destruction actions.  This was part of a larger “Green Scare” that labeled this sort of radicalism as terrorism in the wake of 9/11, and here we saw possible sentences into the hundreds of years as a way to intimidate both the public and the defendants into informing on each other.  The same principle is at play here, yet it is exactly the tools of the state and “anti-terrorism” infrastructures that will attack left-wing radicals and minority groups more severely in the future.

If the term terrorism is empowered to confront the militia standoff, it maintains that power to be used to marginalize later on.  This essentially “borrows from Peter to pay Paul” in that, while using the term to win this rhetorical battle, it can then be used against us later.

 

  1. “Terrorism” Is Besides the Point

 

The Bundy occupation is a ridiculous show of privilege from rich ranchers who exhibit racist, sexist, and bizarre conspiracy ideas that should be exposed and openly opposed.  They represent a regressive part of the American middle class, which holds onto their white privilege as their last life line as they see demographics shift in the U.S.  The militia movement itself was on the decline dramatically through the Bush years, but rose up along with the Tea Party once there was a person of color in the white house.  Most of their narratives see the federal government as “overreaching” and “oppressive” mainly because of minor inconveniences like taxes, which they generally opposed because they do not like the idea of a welfare state being accessible to people who look unlike themselves.  They are a growing and violent part of the white supremacist right, but their problematic nature is not derivative of their tactics in this stand-off.

To focus in on much of the milder protest actions, such as keeping guns on the premises or ranting and raving to the media, then labeling this behavior terrorism, it misses the point that it is their ideology and political role that should be exposed and challenged.  There are very real and obvious impulses and disgusting elements that they represent, but we miss those entirely when we instead focus on the protest action that we cannot tie directly to what gives them political distinction.

Plainly put: we don’t declare this militia movement enemies because this standoff represents “terrorism,” we stand against them because they are racist, sexist, homophobic, Islamophobic, anti-working class, and violently reactionary.  This should be the center of our discourse and narrative about the new Bundy standoff and not whether or not they broke specific laws in their protest actions.

 

  1. The “Terrorism” Double Standard Itself Should Be the Discussion

 

Much of this use of the term “terrorism” when discussing the occupation came from the realization that the media failed to label this group as terrorists, while direct action occupations with people of color are commonly labeled as such.  This is absolutely true and we need to continue to expose the way that white men in confrontational situations are allowed clear perceptive privilege.  There needs to be an ongoing discussion for how the same behavior and actions are characterized for people of color to make them appear more frightening and less rational.

That does not, however, actually mean that anyone in this story are, in fact, terrorists.  Instead, what it should act as is a prompt to see the absolute inequality in media narratives, and we should continue to use moments like these to expose the disparity.  It is not useful to then try to reverse the disparity as, beyond what was mentioned earlier, it just distracts from the issue that people of color are almost always painted as violent extremists.

Anti-fascist writer Spencer Sunshine recently elaborated on this in his articles “Where the Oregon Militias Came From” for The Progressive.

Many of us who watch the far right have long believed that after Rudy Ridge and Waco, the federal government adopted an unspoken rule that it would treat armed (largely white) right-wing groups with kid gloves. While a domestic “war on terror” was unleashed on Muslims and radical leftwing activists, the far right has been spared. This was certainly true at the Bundy Ranch, when Patriot movement activists pointed guns at federal officials, but were never arrested. The federal government has held the door open for the Bundy militia, and they’ve walked through it.

There is certainly a racially charged double-standard in the use of the “terrorism” label; however, the federal terrorism enhancement has been used so wantonly that it is hard to argue in favor of expanding it. Instead of applying it to the paramilitaries, it would be more productive to reevaluate those sentences affected by the 1996 law. While using arson to hide poaching is illegal—as is setting fire to logging machinery—neither one amounts to terrorism.

For a lot organizing on the radical left, we need to consistently consider how tactics used today may be reinterpreted later for broader anti-racist struggle.  This is critical in how we employ terms like “terrorism,” and why it should often be reserved for outright wanton civilian violence.

 

***

Much of what we think of as the militia movement was started with Posse Comitatus in the 1960s, which was built on radicalizing much of the anti-semitic conspiracy theories that were found in places like the John Birch society.  Right from the start it was closely allied with the Christian Identity movement, which was one of the most virulently violent racialist versions of Christianity.  In this interpretation, people of color were considered the “beasts of the field” and not actually humans with souls, Jews were literally the spawns of Satan out to destroy the white race, and the ancient Israelites of the Old Testament are actually European descended people who they now think are in diaspora.  Posse Comitatus organizational charters actually came from Portland, Oregon in 1969 by Henry Lamont Beach, who was formally a member of the Nazi-allied Silver Shirts.  Throughout the existence of the militia movement they kept close allegiences with the more militant rural wings of the neo-Nazi revolutionary movements, most specifically the Christian Identity churches under the banner of Aryan Nations and the Church of Jesus Christ Christian.  It is exactly this connection that fueled the standoff at Ruby Ridge as well as the radicalization see with Timothy McVeigh.  At all levels, the militia movement is built on the foundation of conspiratorial fear of a state built on leftist values, ones that have a secret cabal of “outsiders” and out to benefit people who are not of their insular in-groups.

The newest incarnation of the militia movement has again followed suit by coding racial fears in vague economic and totalitarian terms, which is seen in the creation of the Oath Keepers and the Three Percenters.  The Oath Keepers, made up of former police, military, and first-responders who are making an oath to defend the “people” against perceived government authoritarianism.  What this has meant in practice is actually patrolling in places like Ferguson, Missouri to defend against Black Lives Matter protesters as well as supporting just about every open white nationalist in times of social struggle.  The Three Percenters, named for the unverified theory that only three percent of early American colonists actually rose up and fought the British, have taken all of the “black helicopter” rhetoric even further and often ally with almost explicitly racialist language as they defend “white rights.”  Both groups have made the various Bundy standoffs their pet cause, even though now leadership in the Oath Keepers are now calling for a pull out from Oregon.  This standoff is seeing a strong support from the newer Citizens for Constitutional Freedom, which feels like a a direct inheritor of the racist revolutionary program of Posee Comitatus.

Oregon itself is not just a surprise target in this occupation, which many seem to argue because of the perception of Portland as a liberal homeland.  Instead, this has been a consistent feature of Oregon’s history.  This was the home of the “skinhead wars” of the 1980s and 90s when East Side White Pride skinheads associated with the White Aryan Resistance attacked ethopian student Mulegata Seraw.  The KKK has seen a long history heading all the way back to the state’s founding as a “white homeland,” even up until recent efforts to organize in white working class areas of the city.  Recently, after the shooting at Umqua Community College in Roseberg, militia organized embarrassing “gun rights” rallies to intimidate Obama on his visit.  The Sugar Pine mine fiasco last year, where “patriots” including the Oath Keepers came to defend a mine from BLM intervention, bolstered the idea that these types of militia occupations could be successful.  In that case, a judge finally ordered the BLM to walk away from enforcing normal regulations on the mine.  The logic may be to push local authorities to back down just as they did there and with the Cliven Bundy blunder, and, unfortunately, they could be right.  Without a strong counter-movement, which fights to both counter the reactionaries and the rights of rich property owners, it is hard to see how authorities will not buckle under ongoing pressure from increasingly volatile ideologues.

 

***

While moving away from the terrorism rhetoric, we may be able to more clearly create an opposition that can really counter them politically, and identify them as the racists they are.  Their occupation of both the environmental land and Paiute tribal areas calls for the intersection of the environmental and First Nations movement, as well as highlights the illogical and offensive way that propertied militia members continue to victimize tribal peoples as part of their role in the global land grab.  The Paiute Tribe of the Burns areas has unequivocally called for the militia member to leave, which is not to mention the Hammonds themselves, who have distanced themselves while reporting to prison to serve their sentences.

The growth of the militia movement is not just a problem for Oregon, but for areas across the country as they make up a more rural wing of a larger reactionary political thrust.  Empowered by Donald Trump, given intellectual pedigree by the Alt Right and Neoreaction, and given a voice through trolling and “headline jacking,” militias are only a part of the larger backlash of a growing white nationalist movement.  While the militia in Oregon avoids racialized language, it is those anxieties that hits directly at their root.  For anti-racists and anti-fascists organizers, this means building an intersectional movement that can mobilize beyond the radical sphere is critical to both fighting back when they arrive and eroding their disaffected white working class base.  The Bundy standoff will end soon, and the pundit talking points will fade just as they did after the Nevada sideshow, but it is the reactionary white masculinity that is going to continue to drive confrontations like this.

The impulse to support those going after the government, no matter what their motivations are, is often strong in a disparate radical left without strong political foundations.  In Alexander Reid Ross’s recent article from inside the Bundy occupation, “Toward an Anti-Fascist Analysis of the Malheur Rebellion,” he calls for the need for ongoing counter-organizing since we cannot rely on the state to effectively counter such movements.

We need the Cascadians, moderates, and anti-statists of every variety to come out directly against the Malheur Wildlife Refuge occupation and all other occupations motivated by colonial narratives lodged in racism and the interests of capital. We also need to be respectfully and responsibly introspective about the small ways in which we perpetuate what Joel Olson called “white democracy” in everyday life.  The racists, Islamophobes, and lunatics involved are clearly manipulating our rhetoric for the use of big business and private interests. Their hope—to bring down the government by enshrining the corporate state even further through the sacralization of the patriot movement and its would-be martyrdom—remains the enemy of all we stand for.

While we empathize with many people in Burns who distrust of the FBI, police, and federal government, we also agree with their higher levels of animosity toward the Bundys for bringing those forces to bear in their community. We believe that the far right is ultimately not the government’s responsibility to deal with. Antifascists must organize to stop the spread of the far right with local communities, because no one else will.

This is really true when it comes to the far-right across all cultural manifestations, and we can extend that call to counter as Islamophobia hits critical levels, the Men’s Rights movement only grows, and the internet-focused Alt Right attempts to re-frame the narratives about equality, democracy, and immigration.  A strong counter-movement, one built on a developing anti-racist analysis, is how this type of false consciousness can be answered, and where many of the disaffected members of the white working class can be given an actual revolutionary alternative.

Hate, Now Streaming: White Nationalism’s Podcasting Breakthrough

For most of its post-WWII history, white nationalists have not exactly been on the cutting edge of technology.  What they have done, however, has had mixed results, with some of their outreach efforts becoming massive operations.

Willis Carto turned the Liberty Lobby and its paper, The Spotlight, into a business with hundreds of thousands of subscribers, creating the platform for the Populist Party and making Carto a very wealthy man.  This even lead to the Institute of Historical Review, an “academic institute” whose only function was to deny the Holocaust, which Carto lost and then battled with IHR members like Mark Weber for years over endowments.  Tom Metzger tried to draw out a niche for the White Aryan Resistance by bringing it down into the gutter by producing what they labeled as “the most racist newspaper on earth.”  As his operation and outreach to racist skinheads like Hammerskins and Volksfront grew, he lost his house and everything he owned after Mulugeta Seraw was murdered by WAR affiliated skinheads in Portland, Oregon.  The lawsuit that followed destroyed WAR, and set a new precedent of responsibility for these “behind the scenes” racist organizers.

The real step forward for the white nationalist movement was the development of Stormfront, a white nationalist web-forum developed by Klansman Don Black out of Florida.  Even now, Stormfront has a special place in the world of internet hate, growing month after month.  According to the Southern Poverty Law Center’s The Year in Hate and Extremism 2015 outlined how their growth has been steady.

The total of registered users is just shy of 300,000, a fairly astounding number for a site run by an ex-felon and former Alabama Klan leader. And that doesn’t include thousands of visitors who never register as users. At press time, Stormfront ranked as the Internet’s 13,648th most popular site, while the NAACP site, by comparison, ranked 32,640th.

Their number of registered users has now broken that 300,000 mark, and they have had to update their servers recently just to be able to match the increase in traffic that has come from people discussing Donald Trump.

All of these different communications methods, as successful as some have been for them, are still fossils.  They are relics of the past, both in their distribution format and in their cultural affiliations, rhetoric, and philosophical starting points.  Movements like the Alternative Right, Neoreaction/Dark Enlightenment, Human BioDiversity, Radical Traditionalism, and all related “identiatrians” have almost no cultural connection to many of these more KKK/neo-Nazi derivative formations, even if their ideas are cut and paste from them.

Instead, these movements were New Media bound right from the start, circling around internet blogs like Alternative Right or hidden forums on places like 4Chan.  Today, their outreach has only grown, and the foundation of this outreach strategy has become podcasting.

A real vanguard of this, so to speak, was Richard Spencer and Vanguard Radio.  As we have written before, Richard Spencer began his website Alternative Right in 2010 to bring together all the disparate edges of the conservative movement that were no longer a part of the GOP.  Paleoconservatives, race realists, neoreactionaries, radical traditionalist catholics, ethnic pagans, Evolian traditionalists, nationalists, identitarians, Men’s Rights activists, and so many more were all drawn into this movement.  The real center of this was Vanguard Radio, which was the podcast that was used both as an interview show and, for a time, a regular chat segment with Spencer talking to co-hosts Andy Nowicki and Colin Liddell.  The end of 2013 had a traumatic break from Alternative Right for Spencer who, after stepping down as editor, continued to be associated with the website in the press.  After Rachel Maddow did an expose on Spencer and Alt Right after the Jason Richwine scandal at the Heritage Foundation, Spencer became increasingly upset with Alternative Right continuing.  On Christmas of 2013 he pulled the plug on the website, angering the Nowicki and Liddell, who had become the current editors.  He moved Vanguard Radio over to his new project, the National Policy Institute affiliated Radix Journal, and renamed it the Radix Journal podcast.  Over its years it has interviewed names from the far-right movement, such as anti-semitic psychology academic Kevin McDonald, the male-tribalist Jack Donovan, Counter-Currents editor Greg Johnson, American Freedom Party Presidential Candidate Merlin Miller, the Traditionalist Youth Network’s Matthew Heimbach, and Pat Buchanan, among dozens of others.  He has included a series looking at films by Stanley Kubrick, James Bond books and movies, and a range of other television and films, all of which intending to bring a sort of artistic intellectualism back to the racist right.

Greg Johnson followed suit, using his podcast stream to host talks that he gave on Plato, speeches by nationalists like Johnatahn Bowden, interviews and panel commentaries on white nationalist topics, and to sync together disparate podcasts like Robert Stark’s the Stark Truth.  Matthew Heimbach went on to host episodes at Counter-Currents, help out on the briefly lived Kinest racialist Christian podcast Tribal Theocrat, and to do the occasional Traditionalist Youth Hour.  The podcast field was eventually swamped with white nationalist content, with places like the White Voice, the Nationalist Network, and White Rabbit Radio.  All of these tended to ally with the conspiracy world, often devolving into White Genocide and Zionist Occupied Government narratives.  The very popular Daily Stormer website attempted to bridge the gap between the more bizarre and “old school” factions of the white nationalist scene with the smarter and more contemporary crowd, but they eventually moved their show over to Aryan Radio to be alongside speeches by the neo-Nazi William Pierce.

The internet has been critical for outreach of these groups, and it has been since the mid-1990s, so the fact that there are entire podcast networks dedicated to their work is not surprising.  What is disturbing, however, is the popularity that many of them have gotten.  Radix Journal Podcast and The Daily Shoah, especially, are seeing a renaissance in terms of listeners.  The Daily Shoah, which is the podcast project of The Right Stuff, has only been around since early August 2014 but has already soared in popularity.  This has come mainly from their “Opie and Anthony” approach to politics where they have vulgar skits targeting Jews, people of color, and LGBT people in the most disgusting language possible.  Their popularity has led for them to develop a podcast network of their own coming out of their own crowd, all of which are complete with their own jargon and code-names.  This includes Free Radio Skyrim, Fash Britannia, and Fash the Nation, where two hosts banter mainly about how Donald Trump is the savior of the white race and that Bernie Sanders is just a Jew.

The tools that have allowed their successful outreach are the same ones that have aided the general public in creating the podcasting revolution.  Soundcloud and iTunes are just as accessible for amateur podcasters as they are to NPR, which means that they have incredibly mainstream access points for their streams.  Soundcloud will flag certain types of content, and just a few weeks ago it banned The Daily Shoah for violating its terms of use.  TRS obviously made a joke of this, but it slowed them down as they briefly had to host over at the clunky Archive.org.  They wanted to just host on their own website, but at the point at which they post their show there are literally thousands of downloads.  On every weekly episode they read donations, which account to hundreds of dollars a week, coming from listener donations.

The Radix Journal podcast itself has maintained the popularity immensely, and you can see that on their Soundcloud listings there are between 3,000 and 20,000 full listens even on shows that have not been available for very long.  Spencer has done this all in an incredibly smart way as he utilizes his iTunes streams effectively.  He uses multiple channels, one for the regular podcast, one for the audio of speeches at his conferences, and one for the older conversations he had with Jonathan Bowden several years ago.  All of the podcast stream in iTunes with an RSS feed, which is the same deal with The Daily Shoah, Counter-Currents, Tribal Theocrat, American Renaissance, and several others.  Even for less specific far-right projects, like Jack Donovan’s Start the World or The Pressure Project, subscribers are in the thousands, and only increasing.  As places like The Daily Shoah helped to increase the number of white nationalists active in these online publications and forums, Radix took off as well.  In 2015, Spencer increased his podcasting to about once a week, and the listenership tripled.  He has now publicly committed to doing a once a week podcast, a once a week video(which will also be streamed on the podcast), and also doing a monthly Google Hangout on YouTube, which is a format that has become popular for The Daily Shoah contributor, Millenial Woes.  What this amounts to, when looking at the entire Alt Right network of media, is an almost constant stream of content who is increasing more rapidly than anyone would have expected.  Spencer says that he expects to, conservatively, double his reach in 2016, and he just might be right.

Stormfront itself has created a podcast of its own, a five day a week operation where Don Black babbles incoherently, showing both that he is out of touch with the world and even his own movement.  This feed has failed to become anywhere near as popular as his successors, which generally shows how different that movement of today has become and how it has left the old-guard racialist groups in the dust.  Even leaving out this radical fringe of the fringe, the numbers are staggering when you simply look at just how many people are listening to the vast majority of these shows on an almost daily basis.

People assume that a huge part of this increase is the candidacy of Donald Trump, and it certainly is, as well as white reaction to changing demographics, refugee immigration, recent crimes from Islamic participants, and Black Lives Matter.  The real issue, however, is less that there is just a “spark” that has caused it, and rather than this new generation of the radical right is just more effective at targeting and growing their base.  They have crafted a message that is more effective than the KKK ever had, and now they have grown to a point that their community has an echo chamber through social media that allows them to continue growing their reach.  In this way, it is less that new converts are being made through events and arguments, and instead that the already-racist are simply being “activated.”

For anti-fascists, this presents an incredible challenge, which means effectively targeting their outlets when possible while continuing to shine a light on the way that they code their messages.  An example of this is their use of iTunes is almost monolithic, and Soundcloud has already proved that it is not going to accept open racialist content.  What anti-fascists and anti-racists cannot do is continue to ignore this faction of the racist community, assuming that they are only an irrelevant fringe.  Instead, their growth signals a real shift in the thinking, and it is going to be critical to grow anti-racist work, confront their organizing directly, and to develop strategies that go far beyond liberal anti-racists narratives so that the very structures of racial inequality can be dismantled.  “No Platform” is critical in this context, and now we are heading to the digital world of confrontation as well as meeting them in the streets.

 

Taking on Fascism and Racism from the Ground Up.