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What Would Have Happened to the Alt Right if Trump Had Lost?

 

The presidential election of 2016 is going to go down as one of the largest political upsets in history.  Even into the evening, most mainstream pollsters and political rags were declaring a decisive Clinton victory, and as the states rolled in red, a sense of desperation hit the streets.  Sure, Clinton was a candidate of the capitalist class, but Trump had awakened the racist id of white America.  No matter what you think of the political caste, he provided a mass mobilization to the Alt Right, who lacked a connection to the mainstream before his campaign.  They had grown by leaps and bounds, but what would have happened to them if Trump had actually lost?

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A slight tone of mourning would have graced the Ronald Regan building as the suit and tie guests make their way through metal detectors and waves of counter-protesters. But also a feeling of victory. The sold-out conference, which sold out its discounted “Millennial” tickets weeks in advance, knows where its boost has come from. Even if Trump had lost, their numbers had increased more than any of them could have dreamed.

The National Policy Institute’s annual conference took place on November 19th, and was the largest Alt Right meeting of the year. With the steroid injection they have received from crossover figures like Milo Yianouplous and the caustic rhetoric of Trump, it was not surprising it was the biggest in their short history. The National Policy Institute is the benign name for the central institution of the diffuse Alt Right, the latest attempt at rebranding the white nationalist movement. Founded by William Regnery, the inheritor to the Regnery Publishing operation, and Sam Francis, now deceased paleoconservative and racialist author known for his work at the Washington Post, the organization was taken over several years ago by Alternative Right founder Richard Spencer. In the years since, Spencer has made it an “identitarian” think-tank, bringing together the various strains of the Alt Right into a meeting point that can try to take the movement’s ideas forward.

Their conferences have become a “who’s who” of the movement, linking up “shitlords” on Twitter with white racialists who have been in the movement for decades. In years past we have seen people like long-time white nationalist Sam Dickson, VDare founder Peter Brimelow, French New Right philosopher Alain De Benoist, and “male tribalism” advocate Jack Donovan.  In 2016 they rode the wave of celebrity and even included Tila Tequila, the bi-racial reality-television celebrity who has come under fire for her virulent anti-Semitism, anti-black racism, and Holocaust Denial and “flat earth” conspiracy theories. Peter Brimelow was ported over again, as well as Dr. Kevin MacDonald, a former University of California at Long Beach professor whose work on Jews has become the central doctrine for modern anti-Semitism. Millennial Woes, F. Roger Devlin, and the people behind Red Ice Creations, all of which have become Alt Right stars in the world of Internet podcasting and streaming video, joined them. British nationalist politician Matthew Tait spoke about Brexit after his time supporing the UK Independence Party.

In an attempt to make the NPI gatherings more of a social network and fraternal community, they included nationalist neofolk and post-industrial musicians Xurious and Upward Path, as well as evening cocktails and polite banter before the main conference presentations begin the following afternoon.

For the Alt Right as a branded movement, this was the high water mark, and though the Trump victory added an element of celebration, a loss would have had much the same atmosphere.  One of rebellion, race, and revolution.  The cameras from The Atlantic later caught conference goers Seig Heiling as Richard Spencer yelled “Hail Trump, Hail our people, Hail victory!”

 

Breaking Through to the Mainstream

What is undeniable is that a Trump loss in the Presidential election would have cost the Alt Right their bridge to the GOP.  As Spencer has often derided, the GOP is not explicitly in line with their political vision. Instead, the Republican focus on free markets, tax policy, foreign intervention, and other disparate “idea clusters” distracts from what they want, which is an institution dedicated to manifesting white ethnic interests. Beyond all of their guesses, the GOP then turned in their favor as Trump rode a populist-wave into the Republican nomination, and if Hillary had taken the White House that branding would not have stuck.

Instead, a Trump loss would lead the GOP to strip out all remnants of the Trump campaign, including supporters, messaging, and partnerships. For years the GOP has searched to reestablish a soul, one that was lost after the George W. Bush presidency took the country to the nadir of Neoconservative approval. It went through various stages of possible rebranding, such as the Tea Party and hard libertarianism, but all failed to galvanize the base into a real ideological force that they could ride into a new coherent identity. Trump’s civic nationalism represents another branding opportunity, and a loss would have added it to the list of losing identities.

Places like Breitbart would of moved on to the next trendy thing in conservatism, just like they did in the various incarnations it has been through since Andrew Breitbart first dreamed it up at the Huffington Post. This would have pushed the ‘Alt Lite,” the people like Milo Yianoupoulos and Gavin McGinnis who mainstream the Alt Right’s message, further away from the Alt Right’s ideological core, turning on the white nationalists and repudiating their radical base.

Since the base of Trump’s support in rural and midwestern states have yet to prove that they have a grassroots movement building strategy separate from the Trump campaign, it would have been unlikely that there would have been a mainstream “Trump Republican” movement beyond this election. This message can be drawn explicitly from the Bernie Sanders campaign, which has yet to show that it has legs to exist as something tangible past the election and piecemeal victories like influencing the Democratic Party platform.

For the Alt Right and the various strands of white nationalism, this would have effectively become the “black pill,” a tool for them to lose faith in the political system and forces them to look to other options.

 

No Enemies to the Right

Even before the election, the Alt Right began consolidating itself to the right. In a large part this came from the growth of the Alt Lite and the desire that many had in core Alt Right circles to define themselves ideologically. They were not just “anti-PC, “anti-SJW,” against immigration and for Trump, they were white nationalists. This meant creating strong allies within the “1488 crowd,” which means the more explicit neo-Nazi and KKK communities. This is going to help them re-enter the white nationalist subculture as access to mainstream conservatism shrinks over the coming months. This would help to slowly dissolve the cultural identity that made the Alt Right distinct from the larger white nationalist project, one that was forged out of its middle-class character and associations with high paying tech jobs. As they further meld with the larger mass of white nationalism it will further radicalize their constituency, even if people like Richard Spencer and American Renaissance’s Jared Taylor will desperately try to hold on to the moderate intellectual tone they have achieved.

“I do think that their approach, generally speaking, will be to double down and triple down on overt appeals to Ethnonationalism,” says Tim Wise, an anti-racist writer discussing their possibilities if Trump was to lose.

“There will be a threshold that they will find themselves bumping up against because there is still an aversion to their open fascism.”

This exit from the political sphere would force a “reform vs. revolution” discussion inside of the fascist right, one that has happened for years in anticipation. Even as recently as the 2015 American Renaissance conference there was as a staged debate about whether or not the “race problem” can be solved inside the American political system. Peter Brimelow and former National Review writer John Derbyshire sided with the electoral system, while Spencer and Dickson took a more revolutionary position. With their feelings confirmed, Spencer would likely have continued his call for a “meta-political identity” that can eventually take advantage of what many on the Alt Right see as the inevitable “Balkanization” of American states. They want to foment white revolution just as many neo-Nazis have suggested for years, and that notion would have crystalized after the loss. Their proposed “Ethnostate” would then become a revolutionary project; one that will require the overthrow of the U.S. government in some form, even if they believe the American project is doomed even without their revolutionary opposition.

 

U.S. Under Attack

The most dramatic increase in possibly violent tension from the far right would have happened in the form of the militia movement, which already poses itself as a revolutionary faction. Though Trump will only intensify this turn, it has been validated in the recent acquittal of the Bundy family and accomplices in the 2015 occupation and standoff at the Malheur Wildlife Sanctuary outside of Burns, Oregon. The recent verdict in federal court shocked many, especially as arrests and confrontations littered the largely peaceful encampment blocking the Dakota Access Pipeline at Standing Rock. The armed occupation, which damaged sacred Paiute land and cost the state millions, was the latest stage in a build up coming from Patriot groups fighting for privatizing land rights.

Though the Trump camp would likely have been unable to create a grassroots movement outside the election, it is fertile territory for a well-crafted message from militia groups like the Oath Keepers and the 3%ers. They will be able to speak to the rural angst of many of these groups, intermixing their experiences of financial instability with a reactionary white anger. As rural America sees hits on small farms, the decrease of unionized manufacturing, and the shrinking of local economies, the instability is likely to increase these feelings of isolation. The militias have used this to their advantage and have stoked a racially motivated anger out of that situation in the absence of the left.

Though the Alt Right is an outsider to these movements, they can continue to contribute rhetorically by continuing to ignite fears about immigration, non-white crime, and the perils of a “progressive government.” There may even be a material support that begins to transpire as the wealthier elements of the Alt Right attempt to hedge their bets, but either way it will means an effort to further racialized the Patriot movement and prepare them for nationalist confrontation.

 

A Move Towards Violence

The Alt Right, especially in its leadership, has been clear that they do not want violence. For people like Spencer and Taylor, this would change the public perception of their movement and stop them from achieving the mass groundswell they would need for a radical change in the country. They have an uphill battle since the history of white nationalism is the history of racist violence, and its one they are slowly trying to build an alternative for.

The problem for them is that this dynamic would begin to change with a swiftness as their core constituencies, who are radical white nationalists, saw that their previous efforts were partial failures and they begin to look towards possibilities with more firepower. Their rhetoric turns violent through an image of revolution where confrontation with the government, and eventually other races, is inevitable.

“Some of the people who have been brought into this Alt Right orbit, who are not the intellectuals…are going to turn to a much more reactionary approach,” says Wise.

“I fear that there will be a sort of uptick in blatantly terroristic actions, probably done in lone-wolf fashion, not necessarily organized… I think there will be certain there will be some folks in that movement that say ‘It’s time for war.’”

For years, white nationalism has seen this logic through its notion of “lone wolf” violence. This comes from the “leaderless resistance” model proposed by people like Louis Beam, who saw a failure in electoral politics after his participation in the early campaigns of David Duke. The notion was further proposed by Tom Metzger, the founder of the Nazi skinhead allied White Aryan Resistance who was sued into oblivion by the Southern Poverty Law Center after WAR affiliated skinheads murder an Ethiopian student. Lone wolf action sees spontaneous, disconnected violence and murder as a possibility, with the targeting of Jews, non-whites, and political officials as key action items. While this seems disconnected from the discourse inside the Alt Right, its further consolidation within the larger white nationalist movement and a feeling of political helplessness as conservatism abandons them after Trump’s loss could increase its likelihood. When the rhetoric is of necessity and the method is revolution, unstable individuals who feel like they “must do something” have the potential to slip into acts of seemingly random mass violence.

This turn would be self-reinforcing, as the increasingly violent rhetoric would continue to marginalize the Alt Right, which will continue to push it towards violent tendencies.

 

History Repeats Itself

The pattern of white nationalist failure has been seen over the last several decades as they have had similar periods of crossover. In the 1960s, as the Civil Rights movement began to set fire to the policies of the Jim Crow South, many white nationalists saw a crossover potential in the pro-segregationist movement and organizations like the White Citizen’s Councils. As they began to lose the third-era of the Ku Klux Klan began resorting to terrorist violence, including the bombing of children in churches and the murders of civil rights activists.

Through the 1980s, the failure of white nationalist politics to head into mainstream conservatism led to the creation of the revolutionary group The Order. Using support from militia groups and neo-Nazi havens like the Aryan Nations, they went on a stream of bank robberies and murder until federal agents took them down in fiery episodes of violence.

White nationalism from the Second World War onward has a pattern of attempting to find crossover movements that they can use to mainstream their messages. They are inevitably betrayed by those movements as they moderate, which sends their ideological core to become more radical. This often leads to disorganized actions of mass violence that horrifies their leadership, which were hoping that their ethnic nationalism could finally be taken seriously by the mainstream.

With this pattern in mind, it could be a mistake to dismiss the Alt Right as merely a fringe phenomenon of over-privileged white men using Anime avatars from their basement. The Alt Right has shown its ability to utilize electoral campaigns, but that is the end of its reach since it shares the same identity as the organizations posting on Stormfront, reveling in their long history of violence.

Anti-racist movements will have to tangle with this counter force for years to come, and that is only intensifying in Trump’s America. The advantages that these organizations have today is the years of education and multiracial organizing that have built a base to confront these voices, though undoing their logic of conspiracy theory, scientific racism, and manipulation is going to require an ongoing focus on anti-racist education and community empowerment. As these voices transmute and possibly become more pernicious it will mean a stronger effort in communities to see the threat that white nationalism actually presents for safety and to find solutions that both bring the community together and protect the most vulnerable.

Now that Trump has won, the question remains, what’s next?  As Trump betrays his promises, capitulates to international capital, and is a failure at his primary policy points, it is likely the same direction will happen with the Alt Right.  Some segments are growing, as seen with the recent Lauren Southern event, but others are shrinking as well.  It seems like now that Alt Right is trying to define itself back into its radical image, and the final break with Trump could signal a return to the terrorism that white nationalism is known for.

 

 

 

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White Nationalists Pout After Trump Loses Iowa

The level of delusion that many on the racist right had developed about Trump’s candidacy has given the Iowa defeat significant .  This run was the largest crossover point they have had in decades, many using it as the launching pad for their growth.  The American Freedom Party funded robocalls in Iowa voiced by American Renaissance’s Jared Taylor, The Right Stuff’s Fash the Nation podcast was almost entirely dedicated to Trump, and Richard Spencer and the Radix Journal have made Trump their main course of content for months.

Now, with Ted Cruz sweeping Iowa and putting Trump in second(almost third), their vision has been shattered.  Richard Spencer put out a video almost immediately showing his own disappointment for Trump’s fate.  He was holding a small glass with two fingers of bourbon to quell his melancholy.

I certainly found myself with a sinking feeling about two hours in, or so, when thirty percent of the caucuses were reporting and he was down by three, or something, and I sensed a loss…I think, in a way, the election says something about Iowans.

In the video he also mentions that this may not mean anything and that there are a lot of situations where Iowa does not determine exactly who wins the election.  While this is certainly true in some cases, this shows the level of fantasy that they are willing to stick with when their golden boy is falling.  This is a bit ironic after a podcast he did with Paul Gottfried where he made fun of the delusional ideologues who thought that Mitt Romney had a chance against Obama’s re-election.

The Daily Stormer, whose vulgarity is putting them towards the top of the neo-fascist Google search results, posted an article titled “Take Heed, Brothers: We are Still in Charge,” where they again dove into the details of the primary race and spun the results in their favor.  They also worked in a few racial slurs and racist cartoons into their coverage.

Without the cuckold evangelical element, Cruz loses all appeal and becomes just a much less interesting and much less honest version of Donald Trump.

The lack of evangelicals also makes Magic Negro pointless.

In 2012, New Hampshire people really liked Ron Paul (he came in second), so probably Son of Paul will do better there, due to his empty libertarian rhetoric, spreading things out a bit.

The Daily Stormer really could not let it go and instead ran a story the next day suggesting that the polls in New Hampshire put Trump at 34%, above Ted Cruz’ 12%.  They again use this as an opportunity to attack Iowa for going with the Cuban.

Iowa obviously disappointed us all.

But we need to understand that polls were for a long time oscillating there between Cruz and Trump. Nothing has been lost here.

A few people got rustled jimmies when I yesterday made a bunch of mean-spirited jokes about Iowaians being village people, some feeling that I was insulting rural people.

Firstly, I won’t apologize for making fun of Iowaians. Regardless of the reasons behind it, voting for Ted Cruz is a betrayal of America. We are all angry about this, and making fun of these people is a way to let some of that anger out.

Along the same lines, The Right Stuff suggested that Iowa was the “most likely” to be corrupt with voter fraud.  They continued to note that Trump would probably win New Hampshire, which is politically backwards, as was their persistence that Trump was still the front runner.

Kevin McDonald, the former UC Long Beach professor who became the Karl Marx of anti-Semitism and adopted radical white nationalist positions, penned a piece for his pet website, The Occidental Observer.  As with his colleagues, he strained the limits of his understanding of big-party politics by trying to break down the poll numbers.

And sorry, I can’t take the Goldman Sachs-funded Cruz seriously even though he, like Trump, wants to keep Assad in power and, like Trump, is sounding quite patriotic on immigration—with a resounding endorsement coming from none other than Jeff Sessions — as well as trade policy. But his policies on immigration are a pale reflection of Trump’s, and I just can’t help feeling that this is opportunism — realizing that Trump’s populism has legs.  Trump is really angry about the status quo, whereas Cruz only brought up these issues after Trump put them in play. Trump means it and will do everything he can to bring about change. Hard to believe that Cruz will. And hard to believe that this Canadian-born, half-Cuban really has a strong emotional attachment to the traditional White majority of the US.

McDonald also thinks that Trump is headed to victory in New Hampshire, which is curious given the streak for free-market libertarians who have a problem with Trump’s proposed tariff system.

The anti-immigration website VDare, founded by former Forbes writer turned American Renaissance fellow Peter Brimelow, suggested that it was actually “dirty tricks” and voter fraud that robbed Trump of Iowa Caucuses.  They specifically cite Rubio’s surge, a fact that almost all of these groups deplore because of their hope that the GOP base could be mobilized as a white-racial interest group.

Several allegations of voter fraud are being reported in Iowa, especially on the Democratic side. There are reports of missing results and improper methods used to record votes.  But some Republicans also reported absolute chaos.

The bottom line is that the election system is a mess. When votes are this close, we really have no idea who actually won. And the idea that Microsoft has any role in reporting the vote tallies is completely insane.

The New Observer broke down the numbers into fractions of percentage points over different polls in an attempt to explain away the fact that Iowans simply did not prefer the racist.  They again think that Trump will triumph in New Hampshire and South Carolina.  The real enemy here is the Republican party, which apparently “controls” the caucus system in Iowa.

Party primaries in Iowa are run on the “caucus” system, where, instead of going to a polling booth, voters attend local private events run by the political parties to make their selections.

The caucuses are strictly controlled by the party organizations, and are thus heavily weighted in favor of the party machines, made up as they are by only the most involved, dedicated, and long-time party officials.

As a result, they tend not to reflect the very large number of disaffected white voters who have emerged from long periods of political inactivity or even total non-activity—precisely the voters who Trump has very largely appealed to.

This really does not explain how the GOP would alter the voting structure other than openly falsifying them, but its not like the far right is immune to conspiracy theory.

What happens in New Hampshire will be telling and if Trump again comes in almost third they will likely have a complex narrative for why this happened and how it actually reflects Trump’s white popularity.  Even though the electoral process is not a significant factor in anti-fascist strategy, it certainly signals that the Trump-train will no longer be a popular way that the Alt Right attempts to mainstream their views.

 

Well Dressed Racism: American Renaissance Returns to Tennessee

The modern racialist movement is defined by American Renaissance.  It bridges both the organized racism of the past and the contemporary Alt Right, Human BioDiversity, Neoreaction, and other movements who believe themselves superior to the KKK.  AmRen began in the early 1990s by Jared Taylor, a former West Coast editor for PC magazine and consultant to companies dealing with Japan.  Taylor, raised in Japan before going to Yale and then to France for graduate school, is a very literate and well spoken man.  His enunciation is important to him, so much so that he has developed an elitist accent that is just as artificial as his conference’s attempts at pedigree.  He formed AmRen to give intellectual credibility to his growing racist ideas.  He had already been making waves on the racist right when AmRen came into existence, publishing the book Paved With Good Intentions: The Failure of Race Relations in Contemporary America.  Getting good reviews from people like Pat Buchanan, he launched AmRen as a conference and newsletter that would further disseminate racist views using pseudoacademics and reviving old bio-racial rhetoric.

Beginning in 1990, AmRen brought together a couple hundred racists to talk about…well…racism.  What defined AmRen right from the beginning was really marginal ideas on bioscience that justified the notion that black people were inferior.  Speakers often try to replicate academic discourse, yet their ideas are simply that black people have lower IQs, are prone to criminality, and all races have trouble trusting one another for biologically deterministic reasons.  These conferences are also notable in the white nationalist community for its lack of anti-Semitism, though most of the conference attendees are only putting on a face for this event.  Several Jewish speakers have been seen at AmRen, including the ultra-Orthodox Rabbi Mayer Schiller and Mark Levin.  Both of them have been known for writing about IQ gaps and the need for traditional, racially static communities.

Over the years there have been speeches by controversial academics like J. Phillip Rushton, Richard Lynn, and Donald Templer, all of which quickly drop their veneer of respectable scholarship so that they can insult and degrade people of color.  This is all in line with what in “Human BioDiversity” circles is often called the “Yellow Hypothesis.”  This essentially revives a racial taxonomy and hierarchy, but one that shifts the dynamics slightly.  In this view, according to their theories on innate IQ, Asians have the highest IQs, whites just below them, then Latinos far below that and African descended people scraping the bottom of the list along with Australian aborigines.  This is what they use to refuse the label of “white supremacist,” but the dynamic is to suggest that Asians actually lack other qualities because of their high level IQs and therefore whites are essentially “just right.”  Jews, according to this, actually have higher IQs than Asians, but the AmRen crowd usually save that part of their analysis until the conference is over.  What some attendees, such as Professor Emeritus Kevin McDonald, suggest is that the high verbal intelligence that this crowd ascribes to Jews has actually made them a parasite that uses their intellect to manipulate Western men away from their ethnic interests.  Though the general line-up of AmRen is certainly prone to conspiracy theories, this is a step too far for Taylor.

The focus on pseudoscience has really defined AmRen for almost two decades, yet in recent years there has been a shift.  Over the last few renditions of the conference, all of which have been at the Montgomery Bell State Park outside of Nashville, they have shifted away from arguments about racial difference in biology and more in the direction of politics and culture.  They have included many speakers from nationalist parties internationally, as well as many from the Alt Right that talk in vague platitudes in an attempt to revive racial Idealism and Romanticism.  This change is largely because they did not see the resurgence in “white racial consciousness” that they were hoping for from their previous discourse about perceived racial difference.  Taylor has been a bit slow off the mark, and because of the new focus on social media and streaming content, as well as the lower brow focus of modern post-Trump Alt Right, he has been the old man of the community.  While others are trying to maximize this Trump moment, Taylor continues to drivel on about black crime with barely-coded insults to movements like Black Lives Matter.

The coming 2016 conference, which will be held on May 20-22(which is actually longer than most AmRen conferences), replicates this new trend in their programming, as well as returning to attempts at respectability.  Similar to what you see in white nationalist conferences and organizations like the H.L. Mencken Club and the Council of Conservative Citizens, they always try to host speakers who are just on the edge of respectability.  This was the case with people like the late Sam Francis and Joe Sobran, who were both on the edges of the beltway Conservative Movement.

The 2016 conference’s “headliner,” so to speak, is Peter Brimelow, who is exactly the kind of crossover point that AmRen uses to make itself relevant.  Brimelow was a former writer for Forbes and a number of conservative publications, really known for writing about education and the “problem” of the teacher’s unions up through the 1990s.  In 1995 he published his “magnum opus,” Alien Nation, a book that rallied against immigration and the need to tighten the borders.  Brimelow himself was foreign born, a British immigrant, a point that is often lost on his supporters.  He then founded the web publication VDare, which has become a meeting point for the far right who want to focus on immigration as their primary issue.  He has slowly shifted out of the broad GOP crowd and into a racially focused community, speaking at other racist conferences like the H.L. Mencken Club and the National Policy Institute.  His talk brings the conference back to one of their real forces of excitement: Donald Trump.  Titled “The Trump Tsunami and the Future of the Historic American Nation,” Brimelow will continue the fawning appreciation for the billionaire just as most in the AmRen scene have.  Jared Taylor recently voiced a robocall for Trump support in Iowa, funded by the neo-fascist American Freedom Party.

James Edwards is also on the line-up, a person who has not been as prominent over the last year or so of the growing white nationalist movement.  He hosts the Political Cesspool, a white nationalist/populist radio show that is actually on a few AM stations beyond its large internet following.  He is on the board for both the Council of Conservative Citizens and the American Freedom Party, and he spoke up in defense of the CofCC after the Dylan Roof shooting.  The murderer mentioned the CofCC’s website, which obsessively focuses on what they falsely say are differences in black and white crime rates.  He represents a lower-brow sensibility for the AmRen community, which is really summed up by his book Racism Schmacism.  

Flemish nationalist Filip Dewinter will rant about the “Islamisation” of Europe, Ruuben Kaalep will give a plea for Estonian nationalist, and Dan Roodt will talk about “white survival” in post-Apartheid South Africa.  This is part and parcel of the new AmRen: trying to create unity between white racist internationally.  Here they often try to find common cause with white nationalist talking points in Europe, focusing largely on Syrian refugees and Islamic immigration.

RamZPaul will join the AmRen crowd, which he has in recent years, where he does a sort of “stand up routine.”  This mainly consists of awkwardly timed jokes coming straight out of his popular YouTube videos.  His comedic style is telling and has helped groups like The Right Stuff to focus on humor in their racism.  He will discuss the Alt Right, which has been seeing a surge of media attention in recent months because of the entryism that Donald Trump has provided for them.  This theme will be compounded with the inclusion of Uncuck the Right, a new YouTube “sensation” who does racist parody songs in the vein of The Right Stuff.  “Uncuck” is a reference to the Cuckservative meme that the Alt Right recently popularized, referencing the idea that mainstream conservatives do not act in their own racial interests in terms of immigration.  This also really shows AmRen begging to keep themselves relevant in the internet-only “shitlord” movement of angry white men.

Both Taylor and Sam Dickson will be speaking about “identitarianism,” Dickson giving the same “Benediction for Heretics” that he has done every year since 1990s premiere of the conference.

MontgomeryBell
Montgomery Bell facility where AmRen 2016 will be held.

Over the last several years of the conference, protesters have always been present.  In 2010 the conference was effectively shut down when pressure was put on the Four Points Sheraton at the Manassas Battlefield to cancel their reservation.  The following year, he attempted to hold it in a secret location, yet when the location was revealed to be the Airport Sheraton organizers were successfully able to shut it down again.  This later inspired lawsuits from David Yeagley, a self-described “American Indian” who the One People’s Project have revealed is actually Italian and consorts with white nationalists.  He tried to sue, among others, Daryle Lamont Jenkins, but the suits were ultimately unsuccessful before Yeagley passed away.  Now the conference has been moved semi-permanently to Montgomery Bell State Park, a government run facility that has been less responsive to organizing.

In 2013 organizers again clashed with conference attendees, this time out in Nashville.  After the primary conference, attendees including the Traditional Youth’s Network’s Matthew Heimbach and Scott Terry, RamZPaul, and several people from the CofCC and the League of the South all headed to a local par where Antifa organizers were also present.  A scuffle ensued where anti-racist organizers ended up being forced out of the bar, and the staff allowed the fascist parties to stay.

For 2016, research is being done about the attendees and location, and you can expect that the opposition to this festival of white self-congratulation will not be able to continue unchallenged.  If you are in the area, this is going to be one of the prime places to confront the dangerous white nationalist movement.

 

Center for Immigration Studies Associating With Open White Nationalists

Center for Immigration Studies With Kyle Bristow, Know Racist and anti-Semite
Center for Immigration Studies With Kyle Bristow, Know Racist and anti-Semite

Is it a surprise that the Center for Immigration Studies, an openly anti-Muslim and anti-immigrant group, is associating with the fringe of the white nationalist movement?

While the rhetoric around immigration restriction has become commonplace in the backchannels of the Donald Trump campaign and ultra-conservative louspeakers like Breitbart, it is easy to forget that this is a movement that does not have a left, right, and center.  Directly from the start it has been dominated by far-right ideas, with publications like VDare standing directly with the white separatist camp that simply uses Republican talking points to broaden the support for blocking foreign immigrants.

While it is a movement that has been centered on the far-right since the 1980s, it has used crossover points into the mainstream GOP to continue to save face.  Paleoconservatism and Libertarianism of the late-80s was this melting point where people like Pat Buchanan, Sam Francis, and, later, Peter Brimelow, were able to work on anti-immigrant narratives that coded language incredibly cleanly.  These were the crossover individuals that themselves were acceptable both in radical right circles and establishment beltway boardrooms.

It is not uncommon to see someone like Brimelow with the Center for Immigration Studies, but they have now taken it a step further.  In recent reports from places like the Southern Poverty Law Center, it looks like cozying up to the upfront wing of the racialist movement.  Their “Immigration Opinions” volume was written by British nationalist Paul Weston, known for his association with the British Freedom Party and the neo-fascist English Defense League.  Earlier in September, this section was written by Pat Buchanan(the obvious crossover) and Robert Weissberg, of American Renaissance fame.  All of these covered the traditional range of xenophobic topics, including the “third world invasion” and the “Muslim problem.”  The director of the Center for Immigration Studies, took this all a step further, and was pictured with militant white nationalist Kyle Bristow, who is as “out of the Nazi closet” as you get.

This example, though not unexpected, should serve as an example of what the immigration debate has been hinged on.  There has been a lot of “acceptable” faces in this conversation, but this has only appeared this way in as much as they are able to code the language in Dog Whistle jargon.  The foundations of the anti-immigration position, its hard ideas and arguments, were developed and curated on the radical right.  Behind every seemingly moderate proposal at restriction or control is a foundational argument that the U.S. is a white nation that must be preserved as such.  When presented clearly people are able to confront the racial ideas that are scapegoating racial and religious minorities, and it is positive when we can see the dividing line clearly.

#Cuckservative: How the “alt right” Took Off Their Masks and Revealed Their White Hoods

When the #Cuservative meme first came up we assumed that this would be dropped in a couple days, and therefore would not be worth commenting.  It quickly erupted as a “troll focused” group of internet white nationalists used it to attack mainstream conservatives from National Review to Congressional staffers.  Now a couple weeks later it is not only still a viable hashtag, but it is the talk of the town inside the “pro-white” camp.

So what is #Cuckservative?  Why is it unique?

Inside the discussions from white nationalists and racialists about the term Cuckservative, it is clear that they are not entirely sure where it came from.  If it did not come from them, it is certainly popularized by a growing website The Right Stuff.  They promoted the term on their site, their contributors have been using it over and over again under fake Twitter accounts, and they have gone on more popular racist podcasts and websites to discuss the phenomenon.  The term draws from the world cuckold, a concept where by one male has sex with an other male’s female.  This idea has long been a lurid fascination for those with open anti-black bigotry, one that has existed through history in literature like Othello and even occurs naturally when one species of bird lays their eggs in another species’ nest.  White nationalists continue to focus on illusionary concepts like dramatic “group differences” between the races, often accusing African Americans of lower IQs yet large genitals.  This is a way of assuming them more animal-like qualities, but also drawing on folk myths about black male sexuality to demean them.  The flip side of this is that it also assumes them power, one where by the black male is more virile and sexually satisfying than they are.  The fear is then always that they will be cuckolded by having their white partner be seduced by the “sexually and physically superior” person of a different race.  This is both fetishized and feared, and gives us a quick insight into the profoundly disturbed mind of those advocating open racial separation.  Even the most basic discussion of this includes some of the most vile racism that has creeped its way into the 21st century, reminding us the visceral hatred that some people have towards black men.

So why call conservatives Cuckservative?  They regularly advocate for an ethnic politic based on “protecting your own.”  They assume then that white people have distinct racial interests, which are then harmed when non-white groups gain power or are allowed into the society through immigration.  They are then accusing mainstream conservatives who have began to shift (very, very little) to racial inclusivity of being cuckolded by racial minorities.  These Republicans are acting in someone else’s interests at the cost of their own, and therefore are politically a cuckold.

If we are even to ignore the clearly misogynist and racist surface elements of the cuckold name, its popularity and use reveals something very clear about the growing above-ground far-right movement.  To do this, looking at The Right Stuff makes some sense.  This is one of the more disgusting and offensive sectors of the “alternative right” or “neo-reaction” where they choose to openly use racial slurs, degrade women and rape survivors, mock the holocaust and call for violence against Jews.  Their podcast, The Daily Shoah, which is a play on The Daily Show and the Yiddish term for The Holocaust, is a roundtable discussion of different racists broadcasting under pseudonyms.  Here they do voice “impressions” of Jews, and consistently use terms like “Nig Nog,” “Muds(referring to “mud races,” meaning non-white), and calling people of African descent “Dingos.”  The N-word, homophobic slurs, and calls for enforced cultural patriarchy and heteronormativity are commonplace.  Now, this may be what you would expect from a crowd like this, but this is no longer the norm.  The use of rhetoric like this is almost entirely missing from groups like American Renaissance, Counter-Currents, Radix Journal, Alternative Right, and even Stormfront, the main hub for racist groups who recently banned swastikas and racial slurs.  On these various news sites and publishers, you will find a lot of discussions about philosophical “ethnonationalism,” discussions of group differences through “human biological diversity,” and many topics that are often the property of the left such as critiques of state authoritarianism and capitalism.

As this shift in the public far-right discourse happens, The Right Stuff and the Daily Shoah stand out as having a sort of “old school racist” dialogue.  This does not, however, actually leave them on the margins of the movement.  Within the first few days of this #cuckservative Twitter trend the main host of The Daily Shoah, named “goy” from the assumed name that Jewish people have for Gentiles, came onto Richard Spencer’s Radix Journal Podcast to discuss it.  This is the same podcast that, in the next episode, hosted former National Review columnist and VDare founder Peter Brimelow.  Greg Johnson of Counter-Currents, which focuses on their pseudo-intellectual pedigree with attempts at high-brow discussions, jumped down in the mud and actually went on The Daily Shoah and joined in as they constantly called people “N—–s.”  These were only a few of the more “respectable” racists that joined in with this meme, openly supporting The Right Stuff for continuing their work.

It has been long said by Radix founder Richard Spencer that it would be good if people were immediately confused by Radix and thought that it was a website of “far-left” ideas.  Much of this comes from his desire to break from mainstream conservatism, but also to believe that they are beyond “conventional right and left.”  With this you may actually, on first glance, not correlate many of the more popular white nationalist publications and sites to neo-Nazis and the KKK, but the new support of #Cuckservative is revealing.  Underneath the surface language, the coloring and aggression, is a common politic and an open support of one for the other.  What this means is essentially that Radix and Counter-Currents are the same as The Daily Shoah, though they prefer a different script and are targeted towards a college educated crowd rather than a blue collar one.  The Right Stuff tries to mimic the aggression and reactionary insults of right-wing talk radio like Rush Limbaugh, while Radix would love to look a lot more like that trendy Critical Theory journal young grad students are clamoring to be published in.  In the end, however, they both share the same ideas about race and gender.  What separates them?  The thin politics of respectability, and with the open support of The Right Stuff they have lifted this veil and have shown them for what they really are.

So why is #cuckservative trending now?  Well it comes in the direct admiration that many of these people, The Daily Shoah especially, are having for Donald Trump.  This should not be interpreted as the same kind of support they would have had for former candidates like Pat Buchanan or David Duke, but they enjoy the callous and nativist/nationalist rhetoric that he has been throwing around, shifting the Republican primary discourse far to the right.  They like seeing him “Call out” his colleagues, bait women, and openly insults Latino immigrants from the southern border.  He is doing more than “dog whistle” politics, he is openly playing footsy with his racist base.  This has allowed racialist discourse to shift into the public, making #cuckservative an accusation that mainstream Republicans feel like they have to answer to.  And there have even been some clear support from institutional GOP supporters, with people from Breitbart often supporting the nationalists as they call other conservatives “cucks.”

As the “alternative right” attempts to come in as a viable radical alternative to “liberalism” and “multiculturalism” we need to continue to point out that they are discredited and disgusting fascist notions repackaged in fancy internet language.  Cuckservative is a reminder that under their overly-complicated rhetoric, is an angry white man, yelling at his computer because he cannot give up the mild amount of privilege he has been given through the suffering of people of color.